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All of the latest questions and illustrations on "Damage Control" are in the Online Study.

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Damage Control

 

D Small hull leaks can be temporarily repaired by __________. parceling parbuckling seizing caulking Methods and Organization
D Damaged bulkheads often take a permanent set which is independent of the panting or bulge caused by water pressure. To control this, you should __________. use jacks or chain falls to remove the set before installing shores install shoring so that it pushes on the damaged bulkhead while supporting it place sandbags by the bulkhead without installing shores install shoring so the shoring supports the damaged bulkheads without pushing on them Methods and Organization
C You must shore up a bulkhead due to solid flooding forward. The bulkhead approximates a rectangle. The center of pressure of the shores on the bulkhead should be located __________. approximately halfway up the bulkhead evenly over the surface of the bulkhead approximately one-third of the way up the bulkhead at the bottom of the bulkhead Methods and Organization
B You must shore up the collision bulkhead due to solid flooding forward. The bulkhead approximates an inverted triangle. The center of pressure of the shores on the bulkhead should be located __________. evenly over the surface of the bulkhead approximately halfway up the bulkhead approximately two-thirds of the way up the bulkhead at the bottom of the bulkhead Methods and Organization
D The objective of shoring a damaged bulkhead is to __________. make a watertight seal at the damaged area withstand subsequent additional damage force the warped, bulged, or deformed sections back into place support and hold the area in the damaged position Methods and Organization
D When shoring a damaged bulkhead, effort should be taken to spread the pressure over the __________. nearest longitudinal girder nearest watertight door minimum possible area maximum possible area Methods and Organization
B Strengthening damaged bulkheads by using wood or steel is called __________. battening shoring bracing blocking Methods and Organization
C Your vessel has been damaged and you must shore a bulkhead. You should cut the shore __________. approximately 1/2 inch longer than the measured length to allow for trimming to the same length as the measured length approximately 1/2 inch shorter than the measured length to allow for wedges approximately 1/2 inch shorter per foot of shoring to allow for wet expansion Methods and Organization
D A crack in the deck plating of a vessel may be temporarily prevented from increasing in length by __________. welding a doubler over the crack slot-welding the crack cutting a square notch at each end of the crack drilling a hole at each end of the crack Methods and Organization
C Progressive flooding is controlled by securing watertight boundaries and __________. abandoning ship jettisoning cargo pumping out flooded compartments transferring water ballast Methods and Organization
A What must be accurately determined to assess the potential for progressive flooding after a vessel has been damaged? The integrity of the water tight boundaries The operation of the machinery space bilge level alarms The capacity of the water sprinkler systems All of the above. Methods and Organization
C Which type of hull damage should be repaired FIRST? Damage to interior watertight boundaries Damage below the waterline Damage at or just above the waterline Damage in way of machinery rooms Methods and Organization
A Repairing damage to the hull at or above the waterline reduces the threat of __________. continued progressive flooding wind heel capsizing free surface effects Methods and Organization
B Control of flooding should be addressed __________. first following control of fire following restoration of vital services only if a threat exists Methods and Organization
A Progressive flooding may be indicated by __________. a continual worsening of list or trim ballast control alarms excessive draft excessive list or trim Methods and Organization
A The order of importance in addressing damage control is __________. control fire, control flooding, repair structural damage control flooding, control fire, repair structural damage control fire, restore vital services, control flooding restore vital services, control fire, control flooding Methods and Organization
A After an explosion, repair of emergency machinery and services should be accomplished __________. after control of fire, flooding, and structural repairs immediately, before the emergency is under control after control of fire, but before control of flooding after stability is restored Methods and Organization
D The BEST information on the nature and extent of damage to the vessel is obtained from __________. the bridge watch the engine room watch alarms and monitoring devices personnel at the scene of the damage Methods and Organization
D A wooden plug fitted tightly in the vent of a damaged tank may prevent the tank from __________. collapsing developing free surface developing free surface moment filling completely Methods and Organization
A The wooden plug inserted in the vent of a damaged tank should be removed if you are going to __________. pump from the damaged tank fight a fire use the crossover system abandon ship Methods and Organization
D The two factors which make underwater hull repair difficult are accessibility and the __________. threat of progressive flooding availability of tools shape of the hull pressure exerted by the water Methods and Organization
B When patching holes in the hull, pillows, bedding, and other soft materials can be used as __________. strongbacks gaskets wedges shores Methods and Organization
D When plugging holes below the waterline you should __________. eliminate all water entering the hole only plug holes in machinery or other vital spaces plug the largest holes first reduce the entry of water as much as possible Methods and Organization
D In plugging submerged holes; rags, wedges, and other materials should be used in conjunction with plugs to __________. reduce the water pressure on the hull reduce the possibility of stress fractures prevent progressive flooding reduce the water leaking around the plugs Methods and Organization
B The two courses of action if the underwater hull is severely damaged are to plug the openings or to __________. secure power to the compartment establish and maintain flooding boundaries dewater the compartment ballast to maintain even keel Methods and Organization
A Your vessel has grounded on a bar. What should you do? Switch to the high suction for condenser circulating water, if it is submerged. If you cannot get clear immediately, lighten the ship by pumping all ballast overboard. Run the engine full astern to keep from being set further onto the bar. All of the above. Methods and Organization
D Which statement about damage control is TRUE? Water flowing over the fo'c'sle bulwark is more dangerous than a hole in the hull at the waterline. Water flowing into a lower compartment on a ship is more dangerous than water on deck or flowing into an upper compartment. The amount of water entering a ship through a hole varies inversely to the area of the hole. A hole in the hull at the waterline is more dangerous than a hole below the inner bottom. Methods and Organization
B Your vessel has been damaged and is partially flooded. The first step to be taken in attempting to save the vessel is to __________. pump out the water inside the vessel establish flooding boundaries and prevent further spread of flood water plug the hole(s) in the outer shell calculate the free surface effect and lost buoyancy to determine the vessel's stability Methods and Organization
A The wooden plug fitted tightly in the vent of a damaged tank may prevent the tank from __________. filling completely developing free surfaces developing free surface moments collapsing Methods and Organization
A If a vessel takes a sudden, severe list or trim from an unknown cause, you should FIRST __________. determine the cause before taking countermeasures assume the cause is environmental forces assume the shift is due to off-center loading counterflood Methods and Organization
D Your vessel has been loaded in a sagging condition. Enroute you encounter heavy weather and notice buckling in the midships deck plating of your vessel. To relieve the strain you could __________. take a course which most eases the vessel reduce speed pump fuel oil from midships to the ends of the vessel All of the above. Damage Stability
B You are fighting a fire in a cargo hold on your vessel. Which action is most important concerning the stability of the vessel? Removing burned debris from the cargo hold Draining fire-fighting water and pumping it overboard Shutting off electricity to damaged cables Maneuvering the vessel so the fire is on the lee side Damage Stability
C Free communication will adversely affect transverse stability only when the flooded space is __________. completely flooded on the centerline off-center open to the sea above and below the waterline Damage Stability
B Free communication effect is in direct proportion to __________. length of space only length and width of space width of space only neither length nor width Damage Stability
B The greatest effect on stability occurs from loose liquids flowing __________. in and out of a vessel that is holed in a peak tank in and out of a vessel that is holed in a wing tank from fore to aft in the tanks of a vessel from side to side in the tanks of the vessel Damage Stability
A The most detrimental effect on initial stability is a result of liquids __________. flowing in and out of a holed wing tank pocketing in a slack tank as a vessel heels flowing from side to side within the vessel flowing from fore to aft within a vessel Damage Stability
B Many vessels are provided with flume tanks, which also have a dump tank located under the flume tanks. In the event the ship is damaged, you could dump the flume tanks into the dump tank which would __________. reduce the free surface effect and raise the KG reduce the free surface effect and lower the KG not have any effect on free surface and lower the KG not have any effect on free surface and raise the KG Damage Stability
A The percentage of the total surface area or volume of a flooded compartment that can be occupied by water caused by damage is known as __________. permeability form gain one compartment standard center of flotation Damage Stability
D A tank with internal dimensions of 40 feet X 20 feet X 12 feet is pressed with fuel oil weighing 54 pounds per cubic foot. What is the weight, in short tons, of the liquid? 518.4 short tons 11.3 short tons 135.0 short tons 259.2 short tons Damage Stability
A Addition of weight to a vessel will ALWAYS __________. reduce reserve buoyancy increase GM increase righting moments All of the above. Damage Stability
B Your vessel has been in a collision. After assessing the damage, you begin down flooding. This will cause the KB to do what? Remain stationary Rise Shift to the high side Fall Damage Stability
D How do you determine the weight of the vessel that is supported by the ground when a vessel has run aground? This requires extensive calculation and is usually performed only by a naval architect not by a ship's officer. Determine the point where aground and the draft at that point, then calculate it using the grounding formula. Use the inclining experiment formula and substitute the change of trim for the angle of list. Use the hydrostatic tables and enter with the mean draft before grounding and the mean draft after grounding. Damage Stability
A If your vessel is aground at the bow, it would be preferable that any weight removals be made from the __________. bow stern mid-section All of the above. Damage Stability
D Your vessel is damaged and listing to port. There is a short rolling period around the angle of list. The port side freeboard is reduced to 1 foot. There is no trim and the weather is calm. You should FIRST __________. press up a slack double bottom tank on the port side fill an empty centerline double bottom tank jettison the anchors and anchor cables pump out a slack marine portable tank located on the portside amidships Damage Stability
C A vessel aground may have negative GM since the __________. decrease in KM is equal to the loss of draft virtual rise of G is directly proportional to the remaining draft displacement lost acts at the point where the ship is aground lost buoyancy method is used to calculate KM, and KB is reduced Damage Stability
C With damaged floating vessels, the most important consideration is the preservation of __________. instability bilge pumping capacity reserve buoyancy level attitude Damage Stability
D Intact buoyancy is a term used to describe __________. the space at which all the vertical upward forces of buoyancy are considered to be concentrated the volume of all intact spaces above the waterline an intact space which can be flooded without causing a ship to sink an intact space below the surface of a flooded area Damage Stability
B To increase the extent of flooding your vessel can suffer without sinking, you could __________. lower the center of gravity increase reserve buoyancy raise the center of gravity ballast the vessel Damage Stability
C Your vessel has been holed in #1 hold and partially flooded. The hole is plugged against further flooding. In calculating the effect of the flooding on your transverse stability, you should use which method? Compartment standard method Factor of subdivision method Added weight method Lost buoyancy method Damage Stability
B A vessel is described as a two compartment vessel when it __________. has two compartments in addition to the engine room will float if any two adjacent compartments are flooded has no more than two compartments will sink if any two compartments are flooded Damage Stability
C If the cause of a sudden severe list is negative initial stability, counterflooding into empty tanks may __________. cause an increase in the righting arm increase the righting moment cause the vessel to flop to a greater angle bring the vessel to an upright equilibrium position Damage Stability
D Your vessel is damaged with no list, but down by the stern. There is progressive flooding and trim by the stern is increasing. What is the effect on transverse stability after the deck edge at the stern is submerged? KB increases, increasing BM and therefore GM KG increases due to the weight of the added water on deck There is no effect on transverse stability. BM decreases from loss of water plane and greater volume. Damage Stability
D A continual worsening of the list or trim indicates __________. structural failure an immediate need to ballast negative GM progressive flooding Damage Stability
B Your vessel is damaged, listing to port and on occasion flopping to the same angle to starboard. It has a long, slow, sluggish roll around the angle of list. There is excessive trim by the stern with little freeboard aft. What action should you take FIRST to correct this situation? Pump out the after peak and fill the forepeak to change the trim. Press up any slack double-bottom tanks forward of the tipping center, then fill the forepeak if empty. Jettison any off-center topside weights to lower GM and correct the list. Pump out any slack after double-bottom tanks to reduce free surface and increase freeboard aft. Damage Stability
C During counterflooding to correct a severe list aggravated by an off-center load, your vessel suddenly takes a list to the opposite side. You should __________. continue counterflooding in the same direction continue counterflooding, but in the opposite direction immediately stop counterflooding deballast from the low side Damage Stability
A Your vessel is damaged and is listing to port. The rolling period is short. There is sufficient freeboard so that deck edge submersion is not a problem. What corrective action should be taken FIRST in regard to the vessel's stability? Shift any off-center weights from port to starboard Press up any slack double-bottom tanks to eliminate free surface Jettison topside weights to reduce KG and KB Flood any empty double-bottom tanks to add weight low and down Damage Stability
A You are on the SS American Mariner and involved in a collision. Your draft has increased uniformly and there is about 4 feet of freeboard remaining. The vessel is on an even keel and has a long rolling period. The roll is sluggish, and the vessel hangs at the ends of a roll. Which of the following actions would you take First to correct the situation? Pump out flooding water in the cargo holds to reduce free surface. Pump out a slack double bottom tank to reduce free surface. Flood any empty double bottom tanks to decrease KG. Jettison topside weights to increase freeboard. Damage Stability
D Your vessel is listing 4 to port and has a short rolling period. There is loose firefighting water in the hull. The ship is trimmed down by the head with one foot of freeboard at the bow. Which action should you take FIRST? Jettison stores out of the paint locker in the fo'c'sle. Eliminate the water in the 'tween decks aft. Press up the slack NO.1 starboard double bottom tank. Pump out the forepeak tank. Damage Stability
B Your vessel is damaged and partially flooded. It is listing 12 to port and trimmed 8 feet down by the head. It has a long, slow, sluggish roll. Which action should you take FIRST? Pump out the forepeak tank Press up an after, slack, centerline double bottom tank Jettison the anchors and anchor cables Jettison deck cargo from the port side Damage Stability
D Your vessel is damaged, and there is no list or trim. The rolling period is short. The freeboard before the damage was 12'02" (3.7 meters). It is now reduced to 3'00"(1 meter). Which action would you take FIRST? Pump out the marine potable tank located on the starboard side amidships Transfer ballast from the peak tanks to an amidships centerline tank Press up a slack centerline double bottom tank Pump out an amidships centerline ballast tank Damage Stability
B Your vessel is damaged and listing to port. The rolling period is long, and the vessel will occasionally assume a starboard list. Which action should you take FIRST? Transfer all possible movable weights from port to starboard Press up a slack centerline double bottom tank Fill an empty double bottom tank on the starboard side Pump out ballast from the port and starboard double bottom tanks Damage Stability
D Your vessel is damaged and on an even keel. There is no trim. The freeboard is reduced to less than 1 foot. The rolling period is very long, and the vessel is sluggish in returning from a roll. Which action would you take FIRST to improve stability? Pump out the peak tanks simultaneously. Press up a centerline double bottom that is now filled to 15% capacity. Rig the jumbo boom and use it to jettison heavy deck cargo. In calm seas lower the lifeboats to the water and keep them alongside. Damage Stability
A Damage stability is the stability __________. after flooding which exists when the wind speed is less than 50 knots at the maximum load before collision Damage Stability
A The stability which remains after a compartment is flooded is called __________. damage stability initial stability intact stability immersion stability Damage Stability
B Aboard damaged vessels, the MOST important consideration is preserving __________. bilge pumping capacity reserve buoyancy instability level attitude Damage Stability
D When flooding occurs in a damaged vessel, reserve buoyancy __________. shifts to the low side remains the same increases decreases Damage Stability
A You are fighting a fire in a watertight compartment using hoses and salt water. Stability may be reduced because of __________. increase in free surface which reduces the metacentric height reduction of KG to the minimum allowable reduction of water in the storage tanks progressive downflooding Damage Stability
B Your vessel was damaged and initially assumed a significant list and trim; however, further increase has been slow. Based on this data, what should you expect? The vessel will suddenly flop to the same or greater angle of list on the other side and may capsize. The vessel can probably be saved if further flooding can be stopped. The slowing is only temporary and the vessel will probably suddenly capsize or plunge from loss of stability due to change in the waterplane area. The vessel will continue to slowly list and/or trim due to the free surface effect and free communication effect. Damage Stability
C To prevent loss of stability from free communication flooding you should __________. completely flood high center tanks ballast double bottom wing tanks close any opening to the sea in an off-center tank close the cross-connection valve between the off-center tanks Damage Stability
A Jettisoning weight from topside __________. lowers the center of gravity raises the center of buoyancy reduces free surface effect returns the vessel to an even keel Damage Stability
A Reserve buoyancy is the __________. volume of intact space above the waterline unoccupied space below the waterline difference in the buoyant force in salt and fresh waters excess of the buoyant force over the gravity force Damage Stability
C Reserve buoyancy is the __________. the void portion of the ship below the waterline which is enclosed and watertight also called GM the watertight portion of a vessel above the waterline affected by the number of transverse watertight bulkheads Damage Stability
C The volume of a vessel's intact watertight space above the waterline is its __________. free surface marginal stability reserve buoyancy freeboard Damage Stability
D Which is an indication of reserve buoyancy? Rolling period Metacentric height Righting moment Freeboard Damage Stability
D Reserve buoyancy is the __________. the void portion of the ship below the waterline which is enclosed and watertight a measure of metacentric height transverse watertight bulkheads the watertight part of a vessel above the waterline Damage Stability
C Your vessel has run aground and is touching bottom for the first one-quarter of its length. What is the LEAST desirable method from the standpoint of stability to decrease the bottom pressure? Discharge forward deck cargo. Flood an after double-bottom tank. Pump out the forepeak tank. Shift deck cargo aft. Damage Stability
C Your vessel has run hard aground in an area subject to heavy wave action. Backing full astern failed to free her. Which action should be taken next? Wait for high tide and then try backing. Shift weight aft to reduce the forward draft. Flood empty tanks to increase bottom pressure and prevent inshore creep. Continue backing to scour out the bottom. Damage Stability
D Your ship of 12,000 tons displacement has a center of gravity of 21.5 feet above the keel. You run aground and estimate the weight aground is 2500 tons. The virtual rise in the center of gravity is __________. 1.26 feet 3.80 feet 4.80 feet 5.66 feet Damage Stability
C What would have the greatest affect on a vessel's longitudinal strength? Damage to the side shell, midway between the bilge and the stringer plate Extensive corrosion to the centerline deck plating Grounding damage to the bilge strake, just aft of midships Collision damage to the bow, forward of the collision bulkhead Damage Stability