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The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 29'-04", AFT 30'-06". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 101.6 tons of seawater. FWD 29'-04.5", AFT 30'-10.0" FWD 29'-07.6", AFT 30'-05.0" FWD 29'-04.5", AFT 30'-07.5" FWD 30'-00.8", AFT 30'-01.0"
The maximum draft of the SS AMERICAN MARINER cannot exceed 28'-08" in order to cross a bar. The present drafts are: FWD 28'-00", AFT 29'-00". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum amount of sea water to ballast the forepeak to achieve this condition. 44.4 tons 58.0 tons 76.7 tons 116.0 tons
The maximum draft of the SS AMERICAN MARINER cannot exceed 30'-01" in order to cross a bar. The present drafts are: FWD 29'-04", AFT 30'-06". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum amount of sea water to ballast the forepeak to achieve this condition. 97 tons 100 tons 103 tons 106 tons
The draft of the SS AMERICAN MARINER cannot exceed 23'-06" in order to cross a bar. The present drafts are: FWD 22'-03", AFT 24'-00". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum amount of sea water to ballast the forepeak to achieve this condition __________. 120 tons 77 tons 124 tons 96 tons
Using the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, determine the danger angle for permanent list if the KG is 23.7 feet and the drafts are: FWD 28'-00", AFT 28'-06". 16° 21° 41° 56°
Using the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, determine the danger angle for permanent list if the KG is 22.2 feet and the drafts are: FWD 23'-06", AFT 24'-03". 26° 30° 34° 53°
Using the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, determine the danger angle for permanent list if the KG is 21.2 feet and the drafts are: FWD 27'-11", AFT 28'-07". 24° 52° 19° 72°
Using the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, determine the danger angle for permanent list if the KG is 22.4 feet, and the drafts are: FWD 19'-06", AFT 20'-00". 12° 24° 48° 52°
Using the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, determine the danger angle for permanent list if the KG is 21.8 feet and the drafts are: FWD 23'-05", AFT 24'-04". 26° 31° 37° 21°
Using the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, determine the danger angle for permanent list if the KG is 21.8 feet and the drafts are: FWD 19'-05", AFT 20'-01". 31° 52° 45° 26°
Using the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, determine the danger angle for permanent list if the KG is 22.4 feet and the drafts are: FWD 15'-03", AFT 15'-09". 25° 33° 48° 72°
Using the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, determine the danger angle for permanent list if the KG is 25.0 feet and the drafts are: FWD 15'-04", AFT 15'-08". 12° 17° 20° 23°
Your vessel displaces 479 tons. The existing deck cargo has a center of gravity of 3.0 feet above the deck and weighs 16 tons. If you load 23 tons of anchor and anchor chain with an estimated center of gravity of 9 inches above the deck, what is the final height of the CG above the deck? 0.33 foot 1.00 foot 1.45 feet 1.67 feet
Your vessel displaces 475 tons. The existing deck cargo has a center of gravity of 2.6 feet above the deck and weighs 22 tons. If you load 16 tons of ground tackle with an estimated center of gravity of 8 inches above the deck, what is the final height of the CG of the deck cargo? 2.14 feet 1.64 feet 1.96 feet 1.79 feet
Your vessel displaces 528 tons. The existing cargo has a center of gravity of 2.9 feet above the deck and weighs 28 tons. If you load 14 tons of ground tackle with an estimated center of gravity of 9 inches above the deck, what is the final height of the CG of the deck cargo? 1.93 feet 1.76 feet 2.43 feet 2.18 feet
Your vessel displaces 564 tons. The existing deck cargo has a center of gravity of 1.5 feet above the deck and weighs 41 tons. If you load 22 tons of ground tackle with an estimated center of gravity of 2.5 feet above the deck, what is the final height of the CG of the deck cargo? 1.62 feet 1.85 feet 2.10 feet 2.46 feet
Your vessel displaces 560 tons. The existing deck cargo has a center of gravity of 4.5 feet above the deck and weighs 34 tons. If you load 10 tons of ground tackle with an estimated center of gravity of 2.8 feet above the deck, what is the final height of the CG of the deck cargo? 4.11 feet 4.36 feet 4.57 feet 4.78 feet
Your vessel displaces 641 tons. The existing deck cargo has a center of gravity of 3.6 feet above the deck and weighs 36 tons. If you load 22 tons of ground tackle with an estimated center of gravity of 2.0 feet above the deck, what is the final height of the CG of the deck cargo? 2.33 feet 2.55 feet 2.77 feet 2.99 feet
Your vessel displaces 640 tons. The existing deck cargo has center of gravity of 2.3 feet above the deck and weighs 18 tons. If you load 12 tons of ground tackle with an estimated center of gravity of 21 inches above the deck, what is the final height of the CG of the deck cargo? 1.75 feet 1.94 feet 2.08 feet 2.26 feet
Your vessel displaces 497 tons. The existing deck cargo has a center of gravity of 2.5 feet above the deck and weighs 24 tons. If you load 18 tons of ground tackle with an estimated center of gravity of 18 inches above the deck, what is the final height of the CG of the deck cargo? 1.86 feet 2.07 feet 2.35 feet 2.76 feet
Your drafts are: FWD 23'-03", AFT 27'-01". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessels displacement if you are in salt water. 12,750 tons 12,900 tons 13,150 tons 13,250 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 23'-03", AFT 24'-01". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessels displacement if you are in fresh water. 11,650 tons 11,800 tons 12,000 tons 12,250 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 24'-09", AFT 27'-02". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessels displacement if you are in fresh water. 13,075 tons 13,350 tons 13,590 tons 13,700 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 24'-09", AFT 27'-02". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessels displacement if you are in salt water. 13,175 tons 13,350 tons 13,490 tons 13,620 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 23'-03", AFT 27'-01". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessels displacement if you are in fresh water. 12,550 tons 12,900 tons 13,200 tons 13,350 tons
What is the displacement of a barge which measures 85' x 46' x 13' and is floating in salt water with a draft of ten feet? 17.5 tons 1117 tons 500 tons 1452 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 26'-04", AFT 28'-08". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 101 tons of seawater. FWD 27'-00.6, AFT 28'-01.7" FWD 27'-01.8", AFT 28'-03.1" FWD 27'-01.2", AFT 28'-02.5" FWD 27'-02.4", AFT 28'-03.7"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 28'-00", AFT 29'-00". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 81.05 tons of seawater. FWD 28'-06.3", AFT 28'-08.0" FWD 28'-07.3", AFT 28'-07.8" FWD 28'-10.0", AFT 28'-08.0" FWD 28'-06.2", AFT 28'-06.2"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 25'-11", AFT 26'-11". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 83 tons of seawater. FWD 26'-04.3", AFT 26'-06.1" FWD 26'-07.7", AFT 26'-05.4" FWD 26'-05.6", AFT 26'-07.5" FWD 26'-06.8", AFT 26'-06.3"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 22'-03", AFT 24'-00". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 100.7 tons of seawater. FWD 23'-01.0", AFT 23'-05.7" FWD 22'-11.3", AFT 23'-04.0" FWD 22'-10.3", AFT 23'-06.0" FWD 23'-00.3", AFT 23'-05.0"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 22'-03", AFT 26'-05". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 77 tons of seawater. FWD 22'-08.7", AFT 26'-02.2" FWD 22'-09.9", AFT 26'-01.0" FWD 22'-09.3", AFT 26'-01.6" FWD 22'-10.5", AFT 26'-00.4"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 28'-00", AFT 30'-04". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 110.8 tons of seawater. FWD 28'-08.2", AFT 29'-11.6" FWD 28'-09.8", AFT 29' 10.4" FWD 28'-10.6", AFT 29' 09.8" FWD 28'-09.0", AFT 29' 11.0"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 22'-03", AFT 25'-05". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 97 tons of seawater. FWD 23'-00.5", AFT 24'-11.1" FWD 22'-11.9", AFT 24'-11.7" FWD 22'-11.3", AFT 25'-00.3" FWD 22'-10.7", AFT 25'-00.9"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 18'-07", AFT 23'-03". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 92 tons of seawater. FWD 19'-04.9", AFT 22'-08.7" FWD 19'-05.4", AFT 22'-08.0" FWD 19'-05.7", AFT 22'-07.7" FWD 19'-06.3", AFT 22'-07.1"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 13'-05", AFT 21'-03". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 88 tons of seawater. FWD 14'-01.8", AFT 20'-09.3" FWD 14'-03.0", AFT 20'-08.1" FWD 14'-03.6", AFT 20'-07.5" FWD 14'-02.4", AFT 20'-08.7"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 16'-10", AFT 19'-04". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 73 tons of seawater. FWD 17'-05.8", AFT 18'-10.9" FWD 17'-07.4", AFT 18'-09.2" FWD 17'-06.8", AFT 18'-09.8" FWD 17'-06.2", AFT 18'-10.4"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 19'-04", AFT 21'-02". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 68 tons of seawater. FWD 19'-11.1", AFT 20'-09.4" FWD 19'-11.7", AFT 20'-08.8" FWD 19'-09.7", AFT 20'-10.0" FWD 20'-00.3", AFT 20'-08.2"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has drafts of: FWD 15'-06", AFT 18'-06". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts if you ballast the forepeak with 62 tons of seawater. FWD 16'-00.7", AFT 18'-01.5" FWD 16'-01.3", AFT 18'-00.9" FWD 16'-00.1", AFT 18'-02.1" FWD 15'-11.5", AFT 18'-02.7"
Your drafts are: FWD 20'-08", AFT 25'-03". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the MT1. 1130 foot-tons 1095 foot-tons 1070 foot-tons 1025 foot-tons
Your drafts are: FWD 16'-02", AFT 20'-08". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the MT1. 920 foot-tons 935 foot-tons 960 foot-tons 980 foot-tons
Your drafts are: FWD 16'-02", AFT 18'-02". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the MT1. 935 foot-tons 960 foot-tons 985 foot-tons 1000 foot-tons
Your drafts are: FWD 23'-03", AFT 27'-01". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the MT1. 1050 foot-tons 1065 foot-tons 1090 foot-tons 1130 foot-tons
Your drafts are: FWD 20'-08", AFT 23'-03". Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the MT1. 1050 foot-tons 1065 foot-tons 1090 foot-tons 1130 foot-tons
A weight of 250 tons is loaded on your vessel 95 feet forward of the tipping center. The vessel's MT1 is 1000 ft-tons. What is the total change of trim? 11.90 inches 18.75 inches 23.75 inches 38.01 inches
A weight of 350 tons is loaded on your vessel 85 feet forward of the tipping center. The vessel's MT1 is 1150 foot-tons. What is the total change of trim? 12.93 inches 23.75 inches 25.87 inches 38.50 inches
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 27'-09", AFT 28'-03"; and the KG is 22.4 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the angle of list if the center of gravity is shifted 1.6 feet off the centerline. 16° 20° 24° 30°
A vessel's drafts are: FWD 16'-03", AFT 16'-09"; and the KG is 21.3 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the angle of list if the center of gravity is shifted 2 feet off the centerline. 12° 14° 20° 22°
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 17'-09", AFT 18'-03"; and the KG is 22.4 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the angle of list if the center of gravity is shifted 1.5 feet off the centerline. 14° 18° 22° 26°
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 21'-09", AFT 23'-03"; and the KG is 20.0 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the angle of list if the center of gravity is shifted 1.9 feet off the centerline. 12° 15° 19°
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 14'-11", AFT 15'-09"; and the KG is 18.2 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the angle of list if the center of gravity is shifted 2.0 feet off the centerline. 12° 16° 19°
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 14'-04", AFT 15'-02"; and the KG is 23.2 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the angle of list if the center of gravity is shifted 1.0 foot off the centerline. 12° 15° 17°
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 15'-09", AFT 16'-08"; and the KG is 23.6 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the angle of list if the center of gravity is shifted 0.9 foot off the centerline. 15° 18° 21° 24°
Your vessel's draft is 16'-00" fwd. and 18'-00" aft. The MT1 is 500 ft-tons. How many tons of water must be shifted from the after peak to the forepeak, a distance of 250 feet, to bring her to an even draft forward and aft? 48 tons 24 tons 52 tons 50 tons
Your vessel's drafts are FWD 20'-09", AFT 21'-01". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if: (1) 320 tons are loaded 47 feet forward of amidships; (2) 82 tons are discharged 110 feet forward of amidships; and (3) 50 tons of fuel are pumped 60 feet forward. FWD 21'-06", AFT 21'-02" FWD 21'-04", AFT 21'-05" FWD 21'-05", AFT 21'-00" FWD 21'-04", AFT 21'-06"
Your vessel's drafts are FWD 20'-08", AFT 23'-00". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if 95 tons of cargo are loaded 76 feet forward of amidships. FWD 21'-01", AFT 22'-11" FWD 20'-09", AFT 22'-09" FWD 20'-08", AFT 23'-00" FWD 20'-09", AFT 23'-01"
A vessel's drafts are FWD 23'-01", AFT 24'-11". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if: (1) 142 tons are discharged 122 feet forward of amidships; (2) 321 tons are loaded 82 feet forward of amidships; and (3) 74 tons are discharged 62 feet aft of amidships. FWD 23'-05", AFT 24'-00" FWD 23'-06", AFT 24'-02" FWD 23'-07", AFT 24'-03" FWD 23'-09", AFT 24'-05"
A vessel's drafts are FWD 20'-08", AFT 20'-10". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if 195 tons of cargo are discharged 76 feet forward of amidships. FWD 19'-07", AFT 20'-10" FWD 19'-09", AFT 21'-01" FWD 20'-00", AFT 21'-00" FWD 20'-01", AFT 21'-05"
Your vessel's drafts are FWD 19'-03", AFT 21'-07". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if 142 tons of fuel are pumped 86 feet aft. FWD 19'-01", AFT 21'-04" FWD 19'-00", AFT 21'-01" FWD 18'-09", AFT 22'-01" FWD 19'-00", AFT 21'-08"
A vessel's drafts are FWD 19'-02", AFT 23'-10". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if 98 tons of fuel is pumped 116 feet forward. FWD 19'-04", AFT 23'-06" FWD 19'-07", AFT 23'-04" FWD 19'-09", AFT 23'-01" FWD 19'-09", AFT 23'-06"
Your vessel's drafts are FWD 20'-08", AFT 23'-00". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if 195 tons of cargo are discharged 76 feet aft of amidships. FWD 20'-05", AFT 21'-11" FWD 20'-07", AFT 22'-01" FWD 20'-11", AFT 22'-00" FWD 21'-03", AFT 22'-04"
Your vessel's drafts are FWD 24'-02", AFT 24'-04". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if 295 tons of cargo are loaded 122 feet aft of amidships. FWD 22'-08", AFT 26'-00" FWD 22'-10", AFT 25'-09" FWD 23'-04", AFT 26'-03" FWD 23'-05", AFT 25'-11"
Your vessel's drafts are FWD 19'-02", AFT 23'-10". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if 98 tons of fuel is loaded 116 feet forward of amidships. FWD 19'-04", AFT 23'-06" FWD 19'-07", AFT 23'-04" FWD 19'-09", AFT 23'-01" FWD 19'-09", AFT 23'-06"
Your vessel's drafts are FWD 19'-03", AFT 21'-07". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if 142 tons of cargo are loaded 86 feet forward of amidships. FWD 18'-09", AFT 21'-04" FWD 18'-10", AFT 21'-01" FWD 19'-10", AFT 21'-08" FWD 19'-11", AFT 21'-04"
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 22'-04", AFT 21'-06". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if: (1) 300 tons are loaded 122 feet forward of amidships; (2) 225 tons are loaded 150 feet aft of amidships; and 122 tons of fuel are pumped 72 feet aft. FWD 23'-02", AFT 23'-01" FWD 23'-00", AFT 23'-00" FWD 23'-03", AFT 23'-05" FWD 22'-11", AFT 22'-09"
Your vessel's drafts are FWD 24'-09", AFT 27'-01". Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts if 122 tons are discharged 76 feet aft of amidships, 128 tons are discharged 54 feet forward of amidships, and 68 tons of fuel is pumped 48 feet aft. FWD 24'-02", AFT 26'-11" FWD 24'-05", AFT 26'-02" FWD 24'-01", AFT 26'-08" FWD 24'-04", AFT 26'-08"
You are scheduled to load 3900 tons of cargo, 45 tons of crew effects and stores and 259 tons of fuel. Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessel's mean draft in fresh water. 18'-02" 18'-06" 17'-08" 17'-11"
You are scheduled to load 3900 tons of cargo, 45 tons of crew effects and stores and 359 tons of fuel. Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessel's mean draft in fresh water. 18'-01" 19'-00" 18'-04" 18'-07"
You are scheduled to load 3200 tons of cargo, 45 tons of crew effects and stores and 323 tons of fuel. Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessel's mean draft in salt water. 17'-00" 16'-10" 16'-07" 16'-04"
You are scheduled to load 3700 tons of cargo, 45 tons of crew effects and stores and 427 tons of fuel. Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessel's mean draft in fresh water. 17'-01" 17'-00" 17'-10" 18'-00"
You are scheduled to load 3700 tons of cargo, 45 tons of crew effects and stores and 427 tons of fuel. Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessel's mean draft in salt water. 17'-01" 17'-05" 17'-10" 18'-00"
You are scheduled to load 4700 tons of cargo, 45 tons of crew effects and stores and 323 tons of fuel. Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessel's mean draft in salt water. 19'-00" 19'-04" 19'-09" 20'-01"
You are scheduled to load 4700 tons of cargo, 45 tons of crew effects and stores and 323 tons of fuel. Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessel's mean draft in fresh water. 19'-00" 19'-03" 19'-07" 20'-01"
You are scheduled to load 3200 tons of cargo, 45 tons of crew effects and stores and 259 tons of fuel. Use the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the vessel's mean draft in fresh water: 16'-06" 16'-04" 16'-09" 17'-00"
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 16'-08", AFT 17'-06"; and the KG is 23.8 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the remaining righting arm at 60° inclination if the center of gravity is 1.7 feet off the centerline. 1.8 feet 2.1 feet 3.0 feet 3.8 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 27'-06", AFT 28'-02"; and the KG is 23.1 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the remaining righting arm at 60° inclination if the center of gravity is 2.4 feet off the centerline. 0.2 foot 2.4 feet 0.5 foot 1.8 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 27'-06", AFT 28'-02"; and the KG is 23.1 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 37° inclination if the center of gravity is 1.8 feet off center. 0.4 foot 1.4 feet 1.8 feet 2.6 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 14'-00", AFT 14'-08"; and the KG is 25.8 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the remaining righting arm at 30° inclination if the center of gravity is 1.5 feet off the centerline. 0.6 foot 1.3 feet 1.9 feet 2.9 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 19'-09", AFT 20'-09"; and the KG is 24.6 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the remaining righting arm at 15° inclination if the center of gravity is 0.5 foot off the centerline. 0.0 feet 0.5 foot 1.2 feet 1.7 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 21'-04", AFT 21'-08"; and the KG is 20.6 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the remaining righting arm at 45° inclination if the center of gravity is 1.2 feet off the centerline. 3.8 feet 4.4 feet 5.2 feet 5.6 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 23'-01", AFT 24'-05"; and the KG is 22.8 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the remaining righting arm at 30° inclination if the center of gravity is 1.9 feet off the centerline. 2.3 feet 0.7 foot 1.4 feet 3.7 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 17'-07", AFT 16'-09"; and the KG is 21.5 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the remaining righting arm at 30° inclination if the center of gravity is 0.9 foot off the centerline. 1.5 feet 2.8 feet 3.6 feet 4.3 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 24'-06", AFT 25'-04"; and the KG is 17.8 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the remaining righting arm at 75° inclination if the center of gravity is 2.5 feet off the centerline. 2.5 feet 3.3 feet 5.4 feet 9.7 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 18'-09", AFT 20'-05"; and the KG is 23.8 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 26° inclination if the center of gravity is 1.0 foot off center. 0.0 feet 0.4 foot 0.8 foot 1.7 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 24'-06", AFT 25'-08"; and the KG is 22.9 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 50° inclination if the center of gravity is 0.5 foot off center. 2.0 feet 2.3 feet 2.6 feet 3.3 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 22'-04", AFT 23'-06"; and the KG is 22.4 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 19° inclination if the center of gravity is 1.3 feet off center. 0.2 foot 0.8 foot 1.4 feet 2.2 feet
Your vessel displaces 9,000 tons and has a KG of 21.2 feet. What will be the length of the remaining righting arm at an angle of inclination of 30° if the center of gravity shifts 2.6 feet transversely? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 3.8 feet 0.9 foot 2.2 feet 1.4 feet
Your vessel displaces 12,000 tons and has a KG of 22.6 feet. What will be the length of the remaining righting arm at an angle of inclination of 30° if the center of gravity shifts 1.8 feet transversely? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 0.8 foot 1.2 feet 1.8 feet 2.3 feet
Your vessel displaces 10,000 tons and has a KG of 22.6 feet. What will be the length of the remaining righting arm at an angle of inclination of 45° if the center of gravity shifts 2.0 feet transversely? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 3.8 feet 2.7 feet 0.9 foot 1.9 feet
A vessel displaces 12,000 tons and has a KG of 22.8 feet. What will be the length of the remaining righting arm at an angle of inclination of 60° if the center of gravity shifts 1.8 feet transversely? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) -1.6 feet -0.1 foot 1.2 feet 1.9 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 27'-06", AFT 28'-02"; and the KG is 23.1 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 60° inclination. 0.9 foot 1.8 feet 2.7 feet 4.5 feet
The sailing drafts are: FWD 25'-03", AFT 26'-03" and the GM is 3.5 feet. Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, to determine the available righting arm at 25° inclination. 0.8 foot 1.4 feet 2.0 feet 2.6 feet
The sailing drafts are: FWD 22'-06", AFT 23'-06" and the GM is 3.3 feet. Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, to determine the available righting arm at 22° inclination. 1.2 feet 1.8 feet 2.4 feet 3.0 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 27'-06", AFT 28'-02"; and the KG is 21.3 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 15° inclination. 0.3 foot 1.3 feet 1.5 feet 1.8 feet
The sailing drafts are: FWD 22'-08", AFT 23'-04" and the GM is 4.6 feet. Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, to determine the available righting arm at 20° inclination. 2.1 feet 2.4 feet 2.8 feet 3.2 feet
The sailing drafts are: FWD 24'-03", AFT 25'-03" and the GM is 5.5 feet. Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book, to determine the available righting arm at 30° inclination. 2.6 feet 2.9 feet 3.2 feet 3.5 feet
The sailing drafts are: FWD 16'-06", AFT 17'-04" and the GM is 2.6 feet. Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, to determine the available righting arm at 15° inclination. 0.4 foot 0.8 foot 1.2 feet 1.9 feet
The sailing drafts are: FWD 23'-02", AFT 24'-06" and the GM is 2.8 feet. Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available righting arm at 30° inclination. 1.3 feet 2.5 feet 3.2 feet 3.7 feet
The sailing drafts are: FWD 14'-08", AFT 15'-06" and the GM is 4.8 feet. Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, to determine the available righting arm at 40° inclination. 5.4 feet 4.3 feet 3.3 feet 3.7 feet
The sailing drafts are: FWD 23'-10", AFT 25'-02" and the GM is 5.3 feet. Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book, to determine the available righting arm at 18° inclination. 0.8 feet 1.1 feet 1.5 feet 1.9 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 22'-09", AFT 23'-07"; and the KG is 24.2 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 18° inclination. 0.7 foot 1.3 feet 2.0 feet 2.3 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 22'-04", AFT 22'-10"; and the KG is 22.6 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 45° inclination. 1.8 feet 2.6 feet 2.9 feet 3.6 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 24'-06", AFT 25'-04"; and the KG is 22.2 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 20° inclination. 0.5 foot 0.8 foot 1.4 feet 2.2 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 18'-06", AFT 19'-01"; and the KG is 18.2 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 35° inclination. 1.8 feet 3.0 feet 4.7 feet 5.8 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 17'-07", AFT 16'-09"; and the KG is 24.8 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 15° inclination. 0.7 foot 1.2 feet 1.9 feet 4.8 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 18'-09", AFT 20'-05"; and the KG is 23.8 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 30° inclination. 0.9 feet 2.1 feet 4.0 feet 5.9 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 18'-09", AFT 20'-05"; and the KG is 23.8 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 15° inclination. 0.7 foot 1.0 feet 1.7 feet 3.8 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 17'-07", AFT 16'-09"; and the KG is 21.5 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 30° inclination. 0.8 foot 1.5 feet 2.7 feet 3.6 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 22'-04", AFT 22'-10"; and the KG is 18.4 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 30° inclination. 1.6 feet 2.9 feet 3.8 feet 4.6 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 24'-04", AFT 25'-10"; and the KG is 23.5 feet. Use the selected stability curves in the blue pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the righting arm at 37° inclination. 1.9 feet 2.1 feet 3.5 feet 4.2 feet
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 17'-05", AFT 20'-01"; and the KG is 25.6 feet. What is the righting moment when the vessel is inclined to 45°? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 18,294 foot-tons 19,709 foot-tons 21,137 foot-tons 22,002 foot-tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 24'-07", AFT 25'-09"; and the KG is 23.2 feet. What is the righting moment when the vessel is inclined to 45°? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 27,008 foot-tons 29,778 foot-tons 32,428 foot-tons 34,663 foot-tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 17'-05", AFT 20'-01"; and the KG is 22.4 feet. What is the righting moment when the vessel is inclined to 15°? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 10,656 foot-tons 12,340 foot-tons 13,980 foot-tons 17,520 foot-tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 14'-11", AFT 16'-01"; and the KG is 24.4 feet. What is the righting moment when the vessel is inclined to 30°? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 24,960 foot-tons 22,870 foot-tons 20,360 foot-tons 18,240 foot-tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 22'-03", AFT 22'-09"; and the KG is 23.2 feet. What is the righting moment when the vessel is inclined to 30°? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 20,790 foot-tons 23,780 foot-tons 25,520 foot-tons 27,260 foot-tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 14'-11", AFT 16'-01"; and the KG is 23.2 feet. What is the righting moment when the vessel is inclined to 15°? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 5,800 foot-tons 7,600 foot-tons 9,272 foot-tons 11,200 foot-tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 22'-03", AFT 22'-09"; and the KG is 24.4 feet. What is the righting moment when the vessel is inclined to 15°? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 4,176 foot-tons 5,916 foot-tons 7,076 foot-tons 9,003 foot-tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 24'-07", AFT 25'-09"; and the KG is 24.0 feet. What is the righting moment when the vessel is inclined to 15°? (Use the selected stability curves in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 5,202 foot-tons 8,666 foot-tons 10,876 foot-tons 11,424 foot-tons
You are reading the draft marks as shown in illustration D032DG. The water level forward is at the top of the 8, and the mean water level aft is at the top of the 8. What is the mean draft? 8'03" 8'00" 8'06" 7'06"
You are reading the draft marks as shown in illustration D032DG. The water level is about 4 inches below the bottom of the number 11. What is the draft? 10'-08" 10'-10" 11'-04" 11'-08"
You are reading the draft marks as shown in illustration D032DG. The water level forward is 4 inches below the 11, and the water level aft is 2 inches below the top of the 11. What is the mean draft? 11'-00" 11'-04" 11'-06" 11'-08"
You are reading the draft marks as shown in illustration D032DG. The water level is at the top of number 8. What is the draft? 8'-00" 7'-09" 8'-06" 8'-03"
You are reading the draft marks as shown in illustration D032DG. The top 2 inches of the 9 forward is visible above the water level, and the water level is four inches below the 10 aft. What is the mean draft? 9'-10" 9'-06" 9'-04" 9'-02"
You are reading the draft marks as shown in illustration D032DG. The water level is at the bottom of number 11. What is the draft? 11'-06" 11'-00" 10'-09" 10'-06"
You are reading the draft marks as shown in illustration D032DG. The water level is about 4 inches below the bottom of 10. What is the draft? 9'-04" 10'-02" 10'-04" 9'-08"
You are reading the draft marks as shown in illustration D032DG. The top 2 inches of number "9" are visible above the waterline. What is the draft? 8'-10" 9'-02" 9'-04" 9'-08"
You are reading the draft marks as shown in illustration D032DG. The water level forward leaves about 4 inches of the 11 visible, and the water level aft is at the top of the 10. What is the mean draft? 10'-06" 10'-08" 10'-10" 11'-02"
You are reading draft marks on a vessel. The water level is halfway between the bottom of the number 5 and the top of the number 5. What is the draft of the vessel? 4'-09" 5'-09" 5'-03" 5'-06"
A vessel's light displacement is 12,000 tons. Its heavy displacement is 28,000 tons. When fully loaded it carries 200 tons of fuel and 100 tons of water and stores. What is the cargo carrying capacity in tons? 11,700 tons 15,700 tons 16,000 tons 27,700 tons
A tanker loads at a terminal within the tropical zone. She will enter the summer zone six days after departing the loading port. She will burn off 45 tons/day and daily water consumption is 8 tons. How many tons may she load over that allowed by her summer load line? 270 278 291 318
A tanker loads at a terminal within the tropical zone. She will enter the summer zone five days after departing the loading port. She will burn off about 45 tons/day and daily water consumption is 8 tons. How many tons may she load over that allowed by her summer load line? 225 235 245 265
A vessel's tropical load line is 6 in. above her summer load line. Her TPI is 127 tons. She will arrive in the summer zone 8 days after departure. She will burn off about 47 tons/day fuel and water consumption is 12 tons/day. How many tons may she load above her summer load line if she loads in the tropical zone? 376 1016 762 472
Your vessel has a forward draft of 26'-11" and an after draft of 29'-07". How many tons of cargo can be loaded before the vessel reaches a mean draft of 28'-06" if the TPI is 69? 204 tons 207 tons 210 tons 213 tons
A vessel's mean draft is 29'-07". At this draft, the TPI is 152. The mean draft after loading 1360 tons will be __________. 29'-09" 29'-11" 30'-04" 30'-07"
A bulk freighter 680 ft. in length, 60 ft. beam, with a waterplane coefficient of .84, is floating in salt water at a draft of 21'. How many long tons would it take to increase the mean draft by 1"? 81.6 tons 64.3 tons 69.6 tons 116 tons
A vessel's drafts are: FWD 14'-04", AFT 15'-08". How much more cargo can be loaded to have the vessel down to the freeboard draft? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 7280 tons 7879 tons 8004 tons 8104 tons
A bulk freighter 680 ft. in length, 60 ft. beam, with a waterplane coefficient of .84, is floating in salt water at a draft of 21'. How many long tons would it take to increase the mean draft by 1"? 65.1 69.6 74.3 76.8
A vessel's drafts are: FWD 19'-00", AFT 17'-02". How much more cargo can be loaded to have the vessel down to the freeboard draft? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 5928 tons 6016 tons 6149 tons 6242 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 14'-04", AFT 12'-08". How much more cargo can be loaded to have the vessel down to the freeboard draft? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 6500 tons 7001 tons 7415 tons 8699 tons
In order to calculate the TPI of a vessel, for any given draft, it is necessary to divide the area of the waterplane by __________. 35 120 240 420
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 13'-11", AFT 11'-09". How much more cargo can be loaded to have the vessel down to the freeboard draft? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 9069 tons 9172 tons 9207 tons 9244 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 18'-09", AFT 20'-03". How much more cargo can be loaded to have the vessel down to the freeboard draft? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 4521 tons 5349 tons 7242 tons 9750 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 18'-09", AFT 19'-01". How much more cargo can be loaded to have the vessel down to the freeboard draft? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 5333 tons 5420 tons 5649 tons 5775 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 13'-11", AFT 16'-05". How much more cargo can be loaded to have the vessel down to the freeboard draft? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 7109 tons 7316 tons 7432 tons 7779 tons
A vessel's drafts are: FWD 19'-00", AFT 21'-10". How much more cargo can be loaded to have the vessel down to the freeboard draft? (Use the information in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 4819 tons 4982 tons 5012 tons 5099 tons
A tanker's mean draft is 32'-05". At this draft, the TPI is 178. The mean draft after loading 1200 tons will be __________. 33'-00" 33'-04" 33'-08" 33'-11"
The TPI curve, one of the hydrostatic curves in a vessel's plans, gives the number of tons __________. pressure per square inch on the vessel's hull at a given draft necessary to change the angle of list 1° at a given draft necessary to further immerse the vessel 1 inch at a given draft necessary to change trim 1 inch at a given draft
A vessel has a maximum allowable draft of 28 feet in salt water and a fresh water allowance of 8 inches. At the loading berth, the water density is 1.011. To what draft can she load in order to be at her marks when she reaches the sea? (The salt water density is 1.025.) 27' 07.5" 27' 08.5" 28' 03.5" 28' 04.5"
Your vessel is floating in water of density 1.010. The fresh water allowance is 8 inches. How far below her marks may she be loaded so as to float at her mark in saltwater of density 1.025? 4.8 inches 8.0 inches 3.2 inches 6.4 inches
Your drafts are: FWD 6'-02", AFT 6'-06". From past experience, you know that the vessel will increase her draft 1 inch for every 5 tons loaded. There is rig water on board and 15 tons of deck cargo. How many more tons of cargo can legally be loaded and still maintain the same trim? See illustration D037DG below. 10 tons 5 tons none 20 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 6'-2", AFT 6'-8". From past experience, you know that the vessel will increase her draft 1 inch for every 6 tons loaded. There is rig water on board and 23 tons of deck cargo. How many more tons of cargo can be loaded and still maintain the same trim? See illustration D037DG below. 24 tons 18 tons 12 tons 6 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 6'-01", AFT 6'-05". From past experience, you know that the vessel will increase her draft 1 inch for every 5 tons loaded. There is rig water on board and 15 tons of deck cargo. How many more tons of cargo can legally be loaded and still maintain the same trim? See illustration D037DG below. 35 tons 10 tons 20 tons None
Your drafts are: FWD 6'-01", AFT 6'-05". From past experience, you know that the vessel will increase her draft by 1 inch for every 7 tons loaded. There is rig water on board and 20 tons of deck cargo. How many more tons of cargo can be loaded while maintaining the same trim? See illustration D037DG below. none 10.5 tons 14.0 tons 17.5 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 6'-00", AFT 6'-06". From past experience, you know that the vessel will increase her draft 1 inch for every 6 tons loaded. There is rig water on board and 17 tons of deck cargo. How many more tons of cargo can be loaded and still maintain the same trim? See illustration D037DG below. 14 tons 18 tons 24 tons 33 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 5'-08", AFT 6'-04". From past experience, you know that the vessel will increase her draft 1 inch for every 7 tons loaded. There is rig water on board and 10 tons of deck cargo. How many more tons of cargo can be loaded and still maintain the same trim? See illustration D037DG below. 14.8 tons 18.0 tons 32.0 tons 25.0 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 6'-01", AFT 6'-10". From past experience, you know that the vessel will increase her draft 1 inch for every 6 tons loaded. There is rig water on board and 11 tons of deck cargo. How many more tons of cargo can be loaded and still maintain the same trim? See illustration D037DG below. 6 tons 12 tons 18 tons 24 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 5'-11", AFT 6'-11". From past experience, you know that the vessel will increase her draft 1 inch for every 7 tons loaded. There is rig water on board and 16 tons of deck cargo. How many more tons of cargo can be loaded and still maintain the same trim? See illustration D037DG below. 8 tons 12 tons 10 tons 14 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 5'-08", AFT 6'-02". From past experience, you know that the vessel will increase her draft 1 inch for every 8 tons loaded. There is rig water on board and 11 tons of deck cargo. How many more tons of cargo can be loaded and still maintain the same trim? See illustration D037DG below. None 10 tons 18 tons 24 tons
Your drafts are: FWD 6'-02", AFT 6'-08". From past experience, you know that the vessel will increase her draft 1 inch for every 6 tons loaded. There is rig water on board and 23 tons of deck cargo. How many more tons of cargo can be loaded and still maintain the same trim? See illustration D037DG below. 6 tons 12 tons 18 tons 24 tons
Use the floodable length curve in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the curve represents 45 percent permeability, and holds 1 and 2 flood, the vessel will sink if the permeability exceeds what percent? 19 (%) 24 (%) 32 (%) 39 (%)
Use the floodable length curve in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the curve represents 45 percent permeability, and holds 2 and 3 flood, the vessel will sink if the permeability exceeds what percent? 23 (%) 31 (%) 37 (%) 26 (%)
Use the floodable length curve in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the curve represents 45 percent permeability and holds 4 and 5 flood, the vessel will sink if the permeability exceeds what percent? 22 (%) 28 (%) 34 (%) 39 (%)
Use the floodable length curve in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the curve represents 45 percent permeability and number 5 hold floods, the vessel will sink if the permeability exceeds what percent? 66 (%) 70 (%) 74 (%) 79 (%)
Use the floodable length curve in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the curve represents 45 percent permeability and number 4 hold floods, the vessel will sink if the permeability exceeds what percent? 40 (%) 48 (%) 53 (%) 60 (%)
Use the floodable length curve in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the curve represents 45 percent permeability and number 3 hold floods, the vessel will sink if the permeability exceeds what percent? 64 (%) 68 (%) 72 (%) 78 (%)
Use the floodable length curve in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the curve represents 45 percent permeability and number 2 hold floods, the vessel will sink if the permeability exceeds what percent? 76 (%) 60 (%) 67 (%) 52 (%)
Use the floodable length curve in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the curve represents 45 percent permeability and number 1 hold floods, the vessel will sink if the permeability exceeds what percent? 63 (%) 66 (%) 71 (%) 77 (%)
Use the material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the KG is 24.0 feet, and the drafts are: FWD 28'-01", AFT 28'-06"; at what angle will the vessel lose positive stability? 64° 71° 77° 82°
Use the material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the KG is 25.2 feet, and the drafts are: FWD 27'-11", AFT 28'-09"; at what angle will the vessel lose positive stability? 54° 59° 65° 71°
Use the material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the KG is 25.8 feet, and the drafts are: FWD 15'-02", AFT 15'-10"; at what angle will the vessel lose positive stability? 73° 79° 87° 98°
Use the material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the KG is 24.2 feet, and the drafts are: FWD 22'-04", AFT 23'-00"; at what angle will the vessel lose positive stability? 72° 78° 86° 92°
Use the material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the KG is 25.2 feet, and the drafts are: FWD 22'-03", AFT 23'-01"; at what angle will the vessel lose positive stability? 92° 77° 68° 61°
Use the material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the KG is 22.0 feet, and the drafts are: FWD 23'-06", AFT 24'-03"; at what angle will the vessel lose positive stability? 76° 84° 89° 98°
Use the material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the KG is 23.0 feet, and the drafts are: FWD 15'-03", AFT 15'-09"; at what angle will the vessel lose positive stability? 57° 72° 81° 90°
Use the material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book. If the KG is 24.2 feet, and the drafts are: FWD 23'-04", AFT 24'-05"; at what angle will the vessel lose positive stability? 67° 71° 75° 79°
Determine the free surface constant for a fuel oil tank 30 ft. long by 40 ft. wide by 15 ft. deep. The specific gravity of the fuel oil is .85 and the ship is floating in saltwater (S.G. 1.026). 0.83 42.7 3787 4571
On a vessel of 34,000 tons displacement, a tank 80 ft. long, 60 ft. wide and 30 ft. deep is half filled with fresh water (SG 1.000) while the vessel is floating in saltwater (SG 1.026). What is the free surface constant for this tank? 2819 2661 42213 40100
On a vessel of 6500 tons displacement, a tank 30 ft. long, 32 ft. wide and 15 ft. deep is half filled with oil cargo (S.G. 0.948) while the vessel is floating in saltwater (S.G. 1.026). What is the free surface constant for this tank? 1336 2162 2731 3240
On a vessel of 7000 tons displacement, a tank 35 ft. long, 30 ft. wide and 46 ft. deep is half filled with liquid cargo (S.G. 0.923) while the vessel is floating in saltwater (S.G. 1.026). What is the free surface constant for this tank? 2731 2390 2024 3240
On a vessel of 6500 tons displacement, a tank 30 ft. long, 32 ft. wide and 18 ft. deep is half filled with liquid cargo (S.G. 1.048) while the vessel is floating in saltwater (S.G. 1.026). What is the free surface constant for this tank? 1152 1336 2390 2731
On a vessel of 6500 tons displacement, a tank 35 ft. long, 25 ft. wide, and 8 ft. deep is half filled with liquid cargo (S.G. 1.053) while the vessel is floating in saltwater (S.G. 1.026). What is the free surface constant for this tank? 1371 1336 1152 16036
On a vessel of 7000 tons displacement, a tank 35 ft. long, 30 ft. wide and 4 ft. deep is half filled with fuel oil (S.G. 0.962) while the vessel is floating in saltwater (S.G. 1.026). What is the free surface constant for this tank? 2109 25974 31328 909090
What is the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface when a tank 60 feet long and 30 feet wide is partially filled with salt water, and is fitted with a centerline bulkhead? (The vessel has a displacement of 10,000 tons.) 0.1 foot 0.8 foot 1.0 foot 1.2 feet
On a vessel of 9,000 tons displacement, compute the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface in a hold having free water on the tank tops. The hold is 20 feet long and 30 feet wide. What is the reduction in metacentric height? .09 feet .12 feet .14 feet .16 feet
On a vessel of 12,500 tons displacement, compute the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface in a hold having free water on the tank top. The hold is 35 feet long and 50 feet wide. What is the reduction in metacentric height? .14 ft .45 ft .55 ft .83 ft
A cargo vessel of 9,000 tons displacement is carrying a slack deep tank of molasses (SG 1.4). The tank measures 20 feet long and 30 feet wide. What will be the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface, with the vessel floating in sea water (SG 1.026)? .142 ft. .177 ft. .195 ft. .212 ft.
A vessel has a cargo hold divided by a shaft alley into two tanks, each 35 feet long and 20 feet wide. Each tank is half filled with sea water. The vessel displaces 5,000 tons. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface effect? .27 foot .30 foot .31 foot .33 foot
Your vessel displaces 747 tons and measures 136'L by 34'B. You ship a large wave on the after deck. What is the reduction to GM due to free surface before the water drains overboard, if the after deck measures 56'L x 34'B and the weight of the water is 58.6 tons? 6.04 feet 6.23 feet 6.51 feet 6.76 feet
Your vessel displaces 840 tons and measures 146'L x 38'B. You ship a large wave on the after deck. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface before the water drains overboard, if the after deck measures 65'L x 38'B and the weight of the water is 76 tons? 8.76 feet 8.93 feet 9.04 feet 9.27 feet
Your vessel displaces 562 tons and measures 121'L x 29'B. You ship a large wave on the after deck. What is the reduction to GM due to free surface before the water drains overboard, if the after deck measures 46'L x 29'B and the weight of the water is 41 tons? 4.43 feet 4.61 feet 4.86 feet 5.12 feet
Your vessel displaces 368 tons and measures 96'L x 28'B. You ship a large wave on the after deck. What is the reduction to GM due to free surface before the water drains overboard, if the after deck measures 42'L x 28'B and the weight of the water is 36 tons? 4.98 feet 5.21 feet 5.43 feet 5.67 feet
Your vessel displaces 477 tons and measures 116'L x 31'B. You ship a large wave on the after deck. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface before the water drains overboard, if the after deck measures 54'L x 31'B and the weight of the water is 51.5 tons? 6.43 feet 6.75 feet 6.99 feet 7.25 feet
Your vessel displaces 968 tons and measures 158'L x 40'B. You ship a large wave on the after deck. What is the reduction to GM due to free surface before the water drains overboard, if the after deck measures 65'L x 40'B and the weight of the water is 80 tons? 9.14 feet 9.45 feet 9.68 feet 9.87 feet
Your vessel displaces 869 tons and measures 136'L x33'B. You ship a large wave on the after deck which measures 52'Lx 33'B. The weight of the water is estimated at 52.8 tons. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface before the water drains overboard? 4.83 feet 5.12 feet 5.46 feet 5.85 feet
Your vessel displaces 689 tons and measures 123'L x 31'B. You ship a large wave on the after deck which measures 65'Lx 31'B. The weight of the water is estimated at 62 tons. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface before the water drains overboard? 5.51 feet 5.67 feet 5.89 feet 6.14 feet
On a vessel of 15,000 tons displacement, compute the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface in a hold having free water in the tank tops. The hold is 50 feet long and 60 feet wide. What is the reduction in metacentric height? 1.54 feet 1.59 feet 1.63 feet 1.71 feet
On a vessel of 10,000 tons displacement, compute the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface in a hold having free water on the tank top. The hold is 40 feet long and 50 feet wide. What is the reduction in metacentric height? 1.1 feet 1.2 feet 1.3 feet 1.5 feet
On a vessel of 12,000 tons displacement, a tank 60 feet long, 50 feet wide, and 20 feet deep is half filled with fresh water (SG 1.000) while the vessel is floating in saltwater (SG 1.026) What is the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface? 0.97 ft. 1.01 ft. 1.35 ft. 1.44 ft.
A 7,000 ton displacement tankship carries two slack tanks of alcohol with a S.G. of 0.8. Each tank is 50 ft. long and 30 ft. wide. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface with the vessel floating in sea water, S.G. is 1.026? .36 ft .46 ft .72 ft .82 ft
What is the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface when a tank 60 ft. wide and 60 ft. long is partially filled with saltwater? (The vessel's displacement is 10,000 tons.) 3.00 feet 3.09 feet 3.15 feet 3.20 feet
A vessel carries three slack tanks of gasoline (SG .68). The vessel's displacement is 8,000 tons. Each tank is 50 ft. long and 20 ft. wide. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface with the vessel floating in sea water (SG 1.026)? .20 feet .24 feet .28 feet .30 feet
A shaft alley divides a vessel's cargo hold into two tanks, each 25 ft. wide by 50 ft. long. Each tank is filled with salt water below the level of the shaft alley. The vessel's displacement is 6,000 tons. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface effect? .56 foot .58 foot .62 foot .66 foot
A shaft alley divides a vessel's cargo hold into two tanks, each 20 ft. wide by 60 ft. long. Each tank is filled with saltwater below the level of the shaft alley. The vessel's displacement is 7,000 tons. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface effect? .29 feet .33 feet .38 feet .42 feet
On a vessel of 10,000 tons displacement, compute the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface in a hold having free water on tank tops. The hold is 50 feet long and 50 feet wide. What is the reduction in metacentric height? 1.2 feet 1.1 feet 1.3 feet 1.5 feet
On a vessel of 12,000 tons displacement, what is the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface when a tank 60 feet long and 60 feet wide is partially filled with water? 2.30 feet 2.43 feet 2.48 feet 2.57 feet
On a vessel of 6,000 tons displacement there are two slack tanks of carbon tetrachloride (SG 1.6). Each tank is 40 feet long and 25 feet wide. What is the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface with the vessel in sea water (SG 1.025)? .39 ft .77 ft .88 ft .95 ft
On a vessel of 5,000 tons displacement there are two slack tanks of acid (SG 1.8). Each tank is 30 feet long and 20 feet wide. What is the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface with the vessel in sea water (SG 1.025)? .11 ft .21 ft .40 ft .82 ft
On a vessel of 9,000 tons displacement there are two slack deep tanks of palm oil (SG .86). Each tank is 40 feet long and 30 feet wide. What is the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface with the vessel in sea water (SG 1.025)? .27 ft .48 ft .57 ft .74 ft
On a vessel displacing 8,000 tons, what is the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface when a tank 45 feet long and 45 feet wide is partly filled with salt water? 1.22 feet 1.16 feet 1.13 feet 1.10 feet
On a vessel of 8,000 tons displacement, compute the reduction in metacentric height due to free surface in a hold having free water in the tank tops. The hold is 40 feet long and 20 feet wide. What is the reduction in metacentric height? 0.1 ft 0.3 ft 0.5 ft 0.9 ft
Your vessel displaces 696 tons and measures 135'L by 34'B. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface if the fish hold (32'L by 29'B by 9'D) is filled with 2.0 feet of water? (Each foot of water weighs 26.5 tons) 1.96 feet 2.04 feet 2.25 feet 2.48 feet
Your vessel displaces 740 tons and measures 141'L by 34'B. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface if the fish hold (41'L by 30'B by 9'D) is filled with 2.5 feet of water? (Each foot of water weighs 35.1 tons) 2.14 feet 2.75 feet 2.96 feet 3.18 feet
Your vessel displaces 645 tons and measures 132'L by 34'B. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface if the fish hold (30'L by 26'B by 8'D) is filled with 3.0 feet of water? (Each foot of water weighs 22.3 tons) 1.76 feet 1.94 feet 2.10 feet 2.44 feet
Your vessel displaces 728 tons and measures 138'L by 31'B. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface if the fish hold (36'L by 29'B by 9'D) is filled with 3.6 feet of water? (Each foot of water weighs 29.8 tons) 2.35 feet 2.50 feet 2.72 feet 2.96 feet
Your vessel displaces 750 tons and measures 151'L by 35'B. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface if the fish hold (60'L by 31'B by 10'D) is filled with 3.5 feet of water? (Each foot of water weighs 53.1 tons) 4.14 feet 4.38 feet 4.55 feet 4.94 feet
Your vessel displaces 930 tons and measures 156'L by 38'B. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface if the fish hold (46'L by 28'B by 8'D) is filled with 1.5 feet of water? (Each foot of water weighs 36.8 tons) 2.16 feet 2.44 feet 2.75 feet 2.99 feet
Your vessel displaces 585 tons and measures 128'L by 26'B. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface if the fish hold (30'L by 18'B by 9'D) is filled with 2.8 feet of water? (Each foot of water weighs 15.4 tons) 0.66 foot 1.12 feet 1.37 feet 1.58 feet
Your vessel displaces 684 tons and measures 132'L by 31'B. What is the reduction in GM due to free surface if the fish hold (32'L by 29'B by 9'D) is filled with 2 feet of water? (Each foot of water weighs 26.5 tons) 2.17 feet 2.32 feet 2.52 feet 3.01 feet
The liquid mud tanks on your vessel measure 24'L by 16'B by 8'D. The vessel's displacement in fresh water is 864 tons and the specific gravity of the mud is 1.47. What is the reduction in GM due to 2 of these tanks being slack? .32 foot .80 foot .96 foot 1.12 feet
The liquid mud tanks on your vessel measure 22'L by 16'B by 7'D. The vessel's displacement is 568 T and the specific gravity of the mud is 1.6. What is the reduction in GM due to 2 of these tanks being slack? 0.56 foot 0.96 foot 1.18 feet 1.43 feet
The liquid mud tanks on your vessel measure 40'L by 20'B by 8'D. The vessel's displacement is 996 T and the specific gravity of the mud is 1.7. What is the reduction in GM due to 2 of these tanks being slack? 0.95 foot 1.26 feet 2.10 feet 2.54 feet
The liquid mud tanks on your vessel measure 32'L by 15'B by 8'D. The vessel's displacement is 640 tons and the specific gravity of the mud is 1.8. What is the reduction in GM due to 2 of these tanks being slack? 0.74 foot 1.24 feet 1.41 feet 1.66 feet
The liquid mud tanks on your vessel measure 20'L by 18'B by 7'D. The vessel's displacement is 986 T and the specific gravity of the mud is 1.6. What is the reduction in GM due to 2 of these tanks being slack? .09 foot .45 foot .88 foot 1.35 feet
The liquid mud tanks on your vessel measure 24'L by 16'B by 8'D. The vessel's displacement in salt water (specific gravity 1.025) is 864 T and the specific gravity of the mud is 1.47. What is the reduction in GM due to 2 of these tanks being slack? 0.32 foot 0.78 foot 0.96 foot 1.12 feet
The liquid mud tanks on your vessel measure 30'L by 15'B by 6'D. The vessel's displacement is 968 T and the specific gravity of the mud is 1.8. What is the reduction in GM due to 2 of these tanks being slack? .19 foot .42 foot .64 foot .87 foot
The liquid mud tanks on your vessel measure 18'L by 10'B by 6'D. The vessel's displacement is 944 T and the specific gravity of the mud is 1.9. What is the reduction in GM due to 2 of the tanks being slack? .08 foot .16 foot .45 foot .90 foot
The liquid mud tanks on your vessel measure 20'L by 18'B by 7'D. The vessel's displacement is 866 T and the specific gravity of the mud is 1.8. What is the reduction in GM due to 2 of these tanks being slack? 0.24 foot 0.56 foot 0.95 foot 1.12 feet
To check stability, a weight of 35 tons is lifted with the jumbo boom, whose head is 35 feet from the ship's centerline. The clinometer shows a list of 7.0° with the weight suspended. Displacement including the weight is 14,000 tons. What would the length of GM in this condition? 0.71 foot 0.95 foot 1.26 feet 2.01 feet
To check stability, a weight of 40 tons is lifted with the jumbo boom, whose head is 40 feet from the ship's centerline. The clinometer shows a list of 6.5° with the weight suspended. Displacement including weight is 16,000 tons. What would be the GM while in this condition? 0.21 foot 0.43 foot 0.88 foot 1.02 feet
To check stability, a weight of 10 tons is lifted with the jumbo boom whose head is 45 ft. from the ship's centerline. The clinometer show's a list of 5.0° with weight suspended. Displacement including the weight is 9,000 tons. What would be the GM in this condition? 0.57 foot 0.72 foot 0.96 foot 1.25 feet
In order to check your vessel's stability, a weight of 40 tons is lifted with the jumbo boom, the boom head being 50 feet from the ship's centerline. The clinometer is then carefully read and shows a list of 5°. The vessel's displacement is 8,000 tons including the suspended weight. What will be the metacentric height of the vessel at this time? 2.74 feet 2.80 feet 2.86 feet 2.93 feet
Your sailing drafts are: FWD 17'-07", AFT 18'-05" and the GM is 3.4 feet. What will be the angle of list if #4 port double bottom (capacity 140 tons, VCG 2.6 feet, and 26 feet off the centerline) is filled with saltwater? (Use the data in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) Less than 1°
A cargo of 40 tons is to be lifted with a boom located 40 feet from the ship's centerline. The ship's displacement including the suspended cargo is 8,000 tons and the GM is 2 feet with cargo suspended. What will the list of the vessel be with the cargo suspended? 4.9° 5.2° 5.7° 6.0°
Your sailing drafts are: FWD 22'-04", AFT 23'-06" and the GM is 3.2 feet. What will be the angle of list if #3 starboard double bottom (capacity 97 tons, VCG 2.5 feet and 23 feet off the centerline) is filled with saltwater? (Use the data in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) Less than 1° 11°
Your sailing drafts are: FWD 24'-02", AFT 24'-10" and the GM is 4.6 feet. What will be the angle of list if #6 starboard double bottom (capacity 95 tons, VCG 2.6 feet, and 21 feet off the centerline) is filled with saltwater? (Use the data in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) Less than 1°
A cargo of 75 tons is to be lifted with a boom located 50 feet from the ship's centerline. The ship's displacement including the suspended cargo is 6,000 tons and GM is 6 feet. The list of the ship with the cargo suspended from the boom will be __________. 5.00° 5.40° 5.94° 6.50°
Your vessel is preparing to lift a weight of 30 tons with a boom whose head is 30 feet from the ship's centerline. The ship's displacement not including the weight lifted is 8,790 tons. KM is 21.5 ft, KG is 20.5 ft. What would be the angle of list when the weight is lifted? 1.4° 2.8° 3.4° 5.8°
Your sailing drafts are: FWD 18'-03", AFT 19'-07" and the GM is 4.3 feet. What will be the angle of list if #2 starboard double bottom (capacity 78 tons, VCG 2.7 feet, and 24.5 feet off the centerline) is filled with saltwater? (Use the data in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book)
Your sailing drafts are: FWD 19'-06", AFT 20'-10" and the GM is 3.3 feet. What will be the angle of list if the #2 starboard deep tank (capacity 100 tons, VCG 19.1 feet, and 24 feet off the centerline) is filled? (Use the data in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) Less than 1°
Your sailing drafts are: FWD 21'-08", AFT 22'-04" and the GM is 3.2 feet. What will be the angle of list if the #6 port deep tank (capacity 201 tons, VCG 11.4 feet, and 25.5 feet off the centerline) is filled? (Use the data in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book)
A cargo of 50 tons is to be loaded on deck 20 feet from the ship's centerline. The vessel's displacement including the 50 ton cargo will be 3,000 tons and the GM three feet. What would be the list of the vessel after loading the cargo? 5.35° 5.80° 6.10° 6.35°
Your sailing drafts are: FWD 14'-04", AFT 16'-02" and the GM is 3.0 feet. What will be the angle of list if #5 port double bottom (capacity 195 tons, VCG 2.6 feet, and 18.5 feet off the centerline) is filled with saltwater? (Use the data in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 13° 16°
A cargo of 100 tons is to be loaded on deck 20 feet from the ship's centerline. The ship's displacement including the 100 tons of cargo will be 10,000 tons and the GM two feet. What would be the list of the vessel after loading the cargo? 5.4° 5.7° 5.9° 6.1°
Your sailing drafts are: FWD 17'-07", AFT 18'-03" and the GM is 2.8 feet. What will be the angle of list if the #4 starboard double bottom (capacity 141 tons, VCG 2.6 feet, and 23.8 feet off the centerline) is filled with saltwater? (Use the data in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 10° 12°
A cargo of 30 tons is to be loaded on deck 30 feet from the ship's centerline. The ship's displacement including the 30 tons cargo will be 9,000 tons and the GM will be 5 feet. What would be the list of the vessel after loading this cargo? 1.14° 2.05° 2.31° 3.40°
A cargo of 60 tons is to be loaded on deck 20 feet from the ship's centerline. The vessel's displacement including the 60 ton cargo will be 6,000 tons and the GM two feet. What would be the list of the vessel after loading this cargo? 5.4° 5.72° 6.12° 6.4°
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is partially loaded with a GM of 2.9 feet and drafts of: FWD 17'-10", AFT 19'-04". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine what tanks you should ballast to increase the GM to 3.9 feet. Tanks: DB4, DT6 Tanks: DB2, DT1, DT6 Tanks: DB6, DT7 Tanks: DB3, DB5, DT8
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is partially loaded with a GM of 3.1 feet and drafts of: FWD 19'-06", AFT 21'-04". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine what tank(s) you should ballast to increase the GM to 3.7 feet. Tanks: DB5 Tanks: DT1 Tanks: DB2, DB7 Tanks: DB3, DT8
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is partially loaded with a GM of 3.1 feet and drafts of: FWD 16'-00", AFT 18'-04". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine what tank(s) you should ballast to increase the GM to 3.6 feet. Tank: DB3 Tank: DT8 Tanks: DT6, DT7 Tanks: DB1, DT1A
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is partially loaded with a GM of 2.6 feet and drafts of: FWD 13'-07", AFT 15'-01". Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine what tanks you should ballast to increase the GM to 3.4 feet. Tanks: DB6, DB7, DT7 Tanks: DB1, DB3 Tanks: DB5, DT1A Tanks: DB4, DT8
You are on a Mariner class cargo vessel. Your drafts are: FWD 17'-04", AFT 19'-04". You wish to increase the calculated GM of 3.0' to 4.2'. What tanks should you ballast? (Use the white pages in the Stability Data Reference Book.) Tanks: DB6, DB3 Tanks: DT7, DT8, DB3 Tanks: DB3, DB4 Tanks: DB2, DB6
You are on a Mariner class cargo vessel. Your drafts are: FWD 26'-06", AFT 28'-02". You wish to increase the calculated GM of 2.7' to 2.9'. What tanks should you ballast? (Use the white pages in the Stability Data Reference Book.) Tanks: DB2 Tanks: DB1, DT1, DT6 Tanks: DB1, DT1 Tanks: DB1
You are on a Mariner class cargo vessel. Your drafts are: FWD 21'-04", AFT 23'-04". You wish to increase the calculated GM of 4.8' to 5.8'. What tanks should you ballast? (Use the white pages in the Stability Data Reference Book.) Tanks: DB2, DB5 Tanks: DB6, DT7 Tanks: DB4, DB7 Tanks: DB2, DB6
You are on a Mariner class cargo vessel. Your drafts are: FWD 22'-06", AFT 25'-06". You wish to increase the calculated GM of 4.8' to 5.9'. What tanks should you ballast? (Use the white pages in the Stability Data Reference Book.) Tanks: DB2, DB6, DB7 Tanks: DB5, DT6 Tanks: DB2, DB5 Tanks: DB3, DB4
You are on a Mariner class cargo vessel. Your drafts are: FWD 24'-00", AFT 25'-08". You wish to increase the calculated GM of 3.0' to 4.1'. What tanks should you ballast? (Use the white pages in the Stability Data Reference Book.) Tanks: DB4, DT6 Tanks: DB3, FB7, DT1 Tanks: DB2, DB6, DT6 Tanks: DB3, DT1A
You have 260 tons of below deck tonnage including liquid mud. Your existing deck cargo is 150 tons with a VCG above the deck of 2.2 feet. What is the maximum additional cargo tonnage you are permitted to load? See illustration D036DG below. 110 tons 140 tons 180 tons 210 tons
You have 640 tons of below deck tonnage. There is no liquid mud aboard. If you have 160 tons of cargo above deck with a VCG above the deck of 3.4 feet, what is the maximum allowed VCG of the remainder of the deck cargo that is permitted? See illustration D036DG below. 1.24 feet 1.65 feet 1.98 feet 2.46 feet
You have 600 tons of below deck tonnage. There is no liquid mud aboard. If you have 150 tons of cargo above deck with a VCG above the deck of 2.8 feet, what is the maximum allowed VCG of the remainder of the deck cargo that is permitted? See illustration D036DG below. 1.96 feet 2.25 feet 3.20 feet 3.55 feet
You have 400 tons of below deck tonnage. There is no liquid mud aboard. If you have 225 tons of cargo above deck with a VCG above the deck of 3.4 feet, what is the maximum allowed VCG of the remainder of the deck cargo that is permitted? See illustration D036DG below. 1.96 feet 2.28 feet 2.65 feet 2.93 feet
You have 710 tons of below deck tonnage. There is no liquid mud aboard. If you have 150 tons of cargo above deck with a VCG above the deck of 3.1 feet, what is the maximum allowed VCG of the remainder of the deck cargo that is permitted? See illustration D036DG below. 1.84 feet 2.13 feet 2.43 feet 2.78 feet
You have 200 tons of below deck tonnage. There is no liquid mud aboard. If you have 140 tons of cargo above deck with a VCG above the deck of 4.2 feet, what is the maximum allowed VCG of the remainder of the deck cargo that is permitted? See illustration D036DG below. 0.56 foot 0.87 foot 1.04 feet 2.44 feet
You have 590 tons of below deck tonnage. There is no liquid mud aboard. If you have 84 tons of cargo above deck with a VCG above the deck of 2.7 feet, what is the maximum allowed VCG of the remainder of the deck cargo that is permitted? See illustration D036DG below. 2.54 feet 2.85 feet 3.11 feet 3.55 feet
You have 240 tons of below deck tonnage. There is no liquid mud aboard. If you have 360 tons of cargo above deck with a VCG above the deck of 2.9 feet, what is the maximum allowed VCG of the remainder of the deck cargo that is permitted? See illustration D036DG below. 1.35 feet 1.86 feet 2.56 feet 3.60 feet
You have 520 tons of below deck tonnage. There is no liquid mud. If you have 160 tons of cargo above deck with a VCG above the deck of 3.2, what is the maximum allowed VCG of the remainder of the deck cargo that is permitted? See illustration D036DG below. 1.43 feet 2.79 feet 3.10 feet 3.64 feet
You have 420 tons of below deck tonnage and 150 tons of above deck cargo on board. You must load 135 tons of liquid mud below deck. How much more deck cargo can you load? See illustration D036DG below. 90 tons 140 tons 155 tons 240 tons
You have 420 tons of below deck tonnage and 180 tons of above deck cargo on board. You must load 140 tons of liquid mud below deck. How much more deck cargo can you load? See illustration D036DG below. 60 tons 100 tons 180 tons 240 tons
You have 180 tons of below deck tonnage including liquid mud. Your existing deck cargo is 300 tons with a VCG above the deck of 3.0 feet. What is the maximum additional cargo tonnage you are permitted to load? See illustration D036DG below. 20 tons 60 tons 100 tons 400 tons
You have 550 tons of below deck tonnage including liquid mud. Your existing deck cargo is 120 tons with a VCG above the deck of 2.6 feet. What is the maximum additional deck cargo tonnage you are permitted to load? See illustration D036DG below. 20 tons 60 tons 120 tons 240 tons
You have 700 tons of below deck tonnage including liquid mud. Your existing deck cargo is 200 tons with a VCG above the deck of 3.0 feet. What is the maximum additional cargo tonnage you are permitted to load? See illustration D036DG below. 20 tons 50 tons 80 tons 210 tons
You have 650 tons of below deck tonnage including liquid mud. Your existing deck cargo is 140 tons with a VCG above the deck of 2.5 feet. What is the maximum additional cargo tonnage you are permitted to load? See illustration D036DG below. 15 tons 48 tons 83 tons 140 tons
You have 480 tons of below deck tonnage including liquid mud. Your existing deck cargo is 200 tons with a VCG above the deck of 2.8 feet. What is the maximum additional cargo tonnage you are permitted to load? See illustration D036DG below. 34 tons 62 tons 134 tons 186 tons
You have 300 tons of below deck tonnage including liquid mud. Your existing deck cargo is 180 tons with a VCG above the deck of 1.9 feet. What is the maximum additional cargo tonnage you are permitted to load? See illustration D036DG below. 108 tons 124 tons 162 tons 342 tons
You have 360 tons of below deck tonnage and 145 tons of above deck cargo on board. You must load 220 tons of liquid mud below deck. How much more deck cargo can you load? See illustration D036DG below. 22 tons 48 tons 94 tons 239 tons
You have 400 tons of below deck tonnage and 230 tons of above deck cargo on board. You must load 220 tons of liquid mud below deck. How much more deck cargo can you load? See illustration D036DG below. 180 tons 60 tons 240 tons none
You have 160 tons of below deck tonnage and 300 tons of above deck cargo on board. You must load 110 tons of liquid mud below deck. How much more deck cargo can you load? See illustration D036DG below. 55 tons 99 tons 140 tons 360 tons
You have 360 tons of below deck tonnage and 210 tons of above deck cargo on board. You must load 100 tons of liquid mud below deck. How much more deck cargo can you load? See illustration D036DG below. 25 tons 65 tons 95 tons 175 tons
You have 60 tons of below deck tonnage and 220 tons of above deck cargo on board. You must load 240 tons of liquid mud below deck. How much more deck cargo can you load? See illustration D036DG below. 65 tons 85 tons 110 tons 125 tons
You have 400 tons of below deck tonnage and 100 tons of above deck cargo on board. You must load 160 tons of liquid mud below deck. How much more deck cargo can you load? See illustration D036DG below. 85 tons 135 tons 195 tons 245 tons
You have 520 tons of below deck tonnage including liquid mud. Your existing deck cargo is 160 tons with a VCG above the deck of 2.7 feet. What is the maximum cargo tonnage you are permitted to load? See illustration D036DG below. 84 tons 160 tons 244 tons 317 tons
You have 50 containers of ships stores each measuring 6'L by 4'B by 3'H and weighing 0.4 ton each. Each container is stowed on deck. What is the maximum VCG permitted of the remaining cargo if you are carrying rig water and load to maximum capacity? See illustration D037DG below. 1.50 feet 2.25 feet 2.66 feet 2.91 feet
You have 8 containers of steward's supplies each measuring 6'L by 6'B by 6'H and weighing 1.5 tons each. Each container is stowed on deck. What is the maximum VCG permitted of the remaining cargo if you are carrying rig water and load to maximum capacity? See illustration D037DG below. 1.00 foot 1.33 feet 1.48 feet 2.00 feet
You have 38 containers of ships stores each measuring 6'L by 6'B by 5'H and weighing 0.6 ton each. Each container is stowed on deck. What is the maximum VCG permitted of the remaining cargo if you are carrying rig water and load to maximum capacity? See illustration D037DG below. 0.54 foot (0.16 meter) 1.06 feet (0.32 meter) 1.35 feet (0.41 meter) 1.64 feet (0.50 meter)
You have 6 containers of rig supplies each measuring 8'L by 4'B by 3'H and weighing 1.6 tons each. Each container is stowed on deck. What is the maximum VCG permitted of the remaining cargo if you are carrying rig water and load to maximum capacity? See illustration D037DG below. 0.4 foot 0.9 foot 1.75 feet 2.18 feet
You have 12 containers of rig supplies each measuring 10'L by 4'B by 5'H and weighing 2.0 tons each. Each container is stowed on deck. What is the maximum VCG permitted of the remaining cargo if you are carrying rig water and load to maximum capacity? See illustration D037DG below. 0.5 foot 0.9 foot 1.1 feet 1.6 feet
You have 4 containers of rig supplies each measuring 8'L by 8'B by 8'H and weighing 1.2 tons each. Each container is stowed on deck. What is the maximum VCG permitted of the remaining cargo if you are carrying rig water and load to maximum capacity? See illustration D037DG below. 1.33 feet 1.68 feet 1.96 feet 2.16 feet
You have 10 containers of rig supplies each measuring 10'L by 6'B by 6'H and weighing 1.8 tons each. Each container is stowed on deck. What is the maximum VCG permitted of the remaining cargo if you are carrying rig water and load to maximum capacity? See illustration D037DG below. 0.94 foot 1.36 feet 1.78 feet 1.96 feet
You have 6 containers of ship stores each measuring 8'L by 4'B by 6'H and weighing 0.5 ton each. Each container is stowed on deck. What is the maximum VCG permitted of the remaining cargo if you are carrying rig water and load to maximum capacity? See illustration D037DG below. 1.06 feet 1.32 feet 1.65 feet 1.90 feet
You are at sea on a vessel that has a beam of 50 feet, and you calculate the period of roll to be 22 seconds. What is the vessel's metacentric height? 0.8 ft 1.0 ft 1.2 ft 1.4 ft
Your vessel measures 114 feet long by 16 feet in beam. If the natural rolling period at a draft of 5'-06" is 6 seconds, what is the GM? 1.38 feet 1.53 feet 1.76 feet 1.98 feet
Your vessel measures 127 feet long by 17 feet in beam. If the natural rolling period at a draft of 7'-10" is 5 seconds, what is the GM? 1.96 feet 2.68 feet 2.24 feet 2.45 feet
Your vessel measures 131 feet long by 20 feet in beam. If the natural rolling period at a draft of 8'-03" is 6 seconds, what is the GM? 2.15 feet 1.93 feet 1.26 feet 1.74 feet
Your vessel measures 126 feet (38.41 meters) long by 21 feet (6.4 meters) in beam. If the natural rolling period at a draft of 8 feet (2.44 meters) is 6 seconds, what is the GM? 3.0 feet (0.90 meters) 2.4 feet (0.70 meters) 3.2 feet (0.98 meters) 2.8 feet (0.85 meters)
Your vessel measures 122 feet long by 18 feet in beam. If the natural rolling period at a draft of 6'-09" is 5 seconds, what is the GM? 1.4 feet 2.1 feet 2.5 feet 2.9 feet
Your vessel measures 125 feet long by 17 feet in beam. If the natural rolling period at a draft of 7'-09" is 6 seconds, what is the GM? 0.95 foot 1.25 feet 1.55 feet 1.78 feet
Your vessel measures 128 feet long by 21 feet in beam. If the natural rolling period at a draft of 7'-06" is 6 seconds, what is the GM? 1.56 feet 2.37 feet 2.55 feet 2.74 feet
Your vessel measures 119 feet long by 17 feet in beam. If the natural rolling period at a draft of 5'-05" is 6 seconds, what is the GM? 1.14 feet 1.36 feet 1.55 feet 1.96 feet
The period of roll is the time difference between __________. full inclination on one side to the next full inclination on the same side full inclination on one side to full inclination on the other side zero inclination to full inclination on one side zero inclination to the next zero inclination
When the wave period and the apparent rolling period are the same __________. roll period increases roll amplitude is dampened synchronous rolling occurs roll period decreases
You are on a vessel that has a metacentric height of 4 feet, and a beam of 50 feet. What can you expect the rolling period of the vessel to be? 11.5 seconds 11.0 seconds 10.0 seconds 10.5 seconds
If your vessel has a GM of one foot and a breadth of 50 feet, what is your vessel's estimated rolling period? 20 seconds 11 seconds 22 seconds 15 seconds
Your vessel has a metacentric height of 1.12 feet and a beam of 60 feet. What will your average rolling period be? 25 seconds 35 seconds 23 seconds 20 seconds
You are on a vessel that has a metacentric height of 1.0 foot and a beam of 40 feet. What can you expect the rolling period of the vessel to be? 15.2 seconds 17.6 seconds 15.9 seconds 17.0 seconds
Your vessel has a displacement of 19,800 tons. It is 464 feet long, and has a beam of 64 feet. You have timed its rolling period to be 21.0 seconds in still water. What is your vessel's approximate GM? 1.1 ft 1.3 ft 1.6 ft 1.8 ft
Your vessel's has a beam of 60 feet, and you observe a still water rolling period of 25 seconds. What is the vessel's metacentric height? 0.8 ft 1.1 ft 1.4 ft 1.6 ft
Your vessel's has a beam of 40 feet, and you observe a still water rolling period of 20 seconds. What is the vessel's metacentric height? 0.3 ft. 0.5 ft. 0.8 ft. 1.1 ft.
You are loading cargo on deck aboard a vessel whose beam is 60 feet and full period of roll is 20 seconds. What is the estimated metacentric height of the vessel? 1.3 ft 1.5 ft 1.7 ft 1.9 ft
Your vessel has a displacement of 10,000 tons. It is 350 feet long and has a beam of 55 feet. You have timed its rolling period to be 15.0 seconds. What is your vessel's approximate GM? 1.18 feet 1.83 feet 2.60 feet 3.36 feet
Your vessel has a displacement of 24,500 tons. It is 529 feet long and has a beam of 71 feet. You have timed your vessel's rolling period to be 25.0 seconds. What is your vessel's approximate GM? 1.25 feet 1.56 feet 1.98 feet 2.43 feet
You have approximately 6 tons of fish on deck. What will be the shift in the center of gravity after you shift the fish to the fish hold, a vertical distance of 7 feet? (total displacement is 422 tons) 0.1 foot 0.9 foot 0.5 foot 0.3 foot
You have approximately 15 tons of fish on deck. What will be the shift in the center of gravity after you shift the fish to the fish hold, a vertical distance of 8 feet? (total displacement is 300 tons) 0.4 foot 0.1 foot 0.3 foot 0.2 foot
You have approximately 29 tons of fish on deck. What will be the shift in the center of gravity after you shift the fish to the fish hold, a vertical distance of 5 feet? (total displacement is 483 tons) 0.5 foot 0.4 foot 0.6 foot 0.3 foot
You have approximately 60 tons of fish on deck. What will be the shift in the center of gravity after you shift the fish to the fish hold, a vertical distance of 8 feet? (total displacement is 960 tons) 0.6 foot 0.5 foot 0.3 foot 0.4 foot
You have approximately 16 tons of fish on deck. What will be the shift in the center of gravity after you shift the fish to the fish hold, a vertical distance of 8 feet? (total displacement is 640 tons) 0.1 foot 0.4 foot 0.3 foot 0.2 foot
You have approximately 24 tons of fish on deck. What will be the shift in the center of gravity after you shift the fish to the fish hold, a vertical distance of 8 feet? (total displacement is 540 tons) 0.44 foot 0.23 foot 0.14 foot 0.36 foot
You have approximately 34 tons of fish on deck. What will be the shift in the center of gravity after you shift the fish to the fish hold, a vertical distance of 7.5 feet? (total displacement is 638 tons) 0.2 foot 0.1 foot 0.3 foot 0.4 foot
You have approximately 14 tons of fish on deck. What will be the shift in the center of gravity after you shift the fish to the fish hold, a vertical distance of 6 feet? (total displacement is 210 tons) 0.2 foot 0.4 foot 0.3 foot 0.5 foot
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 21'-08", AFT 24'-02". The LCG of the forepeak is 200 feet forward of amidships. How many tons of ballast must be pumped into the forepeak in order to have a drag of 15 inches? (Use the selected stability curves in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 72 tons 77 tons 82 tons 87 tons
Your vessel is limited to a maximum draft of 27'-06". The present drafts are: FWD 24'-10", AFT 26'-00". How much more cargo can be loaded and where should it be located if a drag of 1 foot is desired? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 1250 tons 4.3 feet forward of amidships 950 tons 2.5 feet forward of the tipping center 1250 tons 1.4 feet aft of the tipping center 950 tons 5.6 feet aft of amidships
Your vessel is limited to a maximum draft of 26'-03". The present drafts are: FWD 22'-10", AFT 23'-08". How much more cargo can be loaded and where should it be located if a drag of 18 inches is desired? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 875 tons 6 feet aft of amidships 950 tons 8 feet forward of the tipping center 1323 tons 7 feet aft of the tipping center 1452 tons 7 feet aft of the tipping center
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 23'-10", AFT 26'-00". The LCG of the forepeak is 200 feet forward of amidships. How many tons of ballast must be pumped into the forepeak in order to have a drag of 1 foot? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 61 tons 72 tons 79 tons 86 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 21'-08", AFT 24'-02". The LCG of the forepeak is 200 feet forward of amidships. How many tons of ballast must be pumped into the forepeak in order to have a drag of 18 inches? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 53 tons 57 tons 61 tons 65 tons
A vessel is limited to a maximum draft of 26'-03". The present drafts are: FWD 21'-04", AFT 24'-06". How much more cargo can be loaded and where should it be located if a drag of 1 foot is desired? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 1676 tons 18 feet forward of amidships 1676 tons 18 feet forward of the tipping center 1972 tons 16 feet forward of amidships 1972 tons 16 feet forward of the tipping center
A vessel is limited to a maximum draft of 25'-11". The present drafts are: FWD 24'-10", AFT 23'-02". How much more cargo can be loaded and where should it be located if a drag of 18 inches is desired? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 345 tons 124 feet aft of the tipping center 690 tons 62 feet aft of the tipping center 640 tons 74 feet aft of the tipping center 525 tons 18 feet forward of the tipping center
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 23'-10", AFT 26'-00". The LCG of the forepeak is 200 feet forward of amidships. How many tons of ballast must be pumped into the forepeak in order to have a drag of 18 inches? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 34 tons 45 tons 55 tons 61 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 19'-03", AFT 21'-03". The LCG of the forepeak is 200 feet forward of amidships. How many tons of ballast must be pumped into the forepeak in order to have a drag of 18 inches? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 27 tons 31 tons 34 tons 37 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 19'-03", AFT 21'-03". The LCG of the forepeak is 200 feet forward of amidships. How many tons of ballast must be pumped into the forepeak in order to have a drag of 1 foot? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 62 tons 68 tons 74 tons 78 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 14'-04", AFT 17'-08". The LCG of the forepeak is 200 feet forward of amidships. How many tons of ballast must be pumped into the forepeak in order to have a drag of 18 inches? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 98 tons 86 tons 110 tons 105 tons
Your vessel's draft is 24'-06" forward and aft. The MT1 of your vessel is 1000 ft-tons. How many tons of cargo must be loaded in number 4 hold, which is 100 feet abaft the tipping center, if she is to have a 2 foot drag? 120 tons 240 tons 300 tons 480 tons
Your vessel is on an even keel. The MT1 of your vessel is 1000 ft-tons. How many tons of cargo must be loaded in number 4 hold which is 100 feet abaft the tipping center, if she is to have a 2 foot drag? 240 tons 100 tons 130 tons 90 tons
Your vessel's drafts are: FWD 14'-04", AFT 17'-08". The LCG of the forepeak is 200 feet forward of amidships. How many tons of ballast must be pumped into the forepeak in order to have a drag of 2 feet? (Use the reference material in Section 1, the blue pages, of the Stability Data Reference Book) 62 tons 65 tons 72 tons 75 tons
You are hoisting a heavy lift with the jumbo boom. Your vessel displaces 8560 T. The 45-ton weight is on the pier and its center is 65' to starboard of the centerline. The head of the boom is 95' above the base line and the center of gravity of the lift when stowed on deck will be 55' above the base line. As the jumbo boom takes the strain the ship lists to 5.5°. What is the GM with the cargo stowed? 3.74 ft. 3.96 ft. 4.16 ft. 4.35 ft.
You are hoisting a heavy lift with the jumbo boom. Your vessel displaces 5230 T. The 35-ton weight is on the pier and its center is 60' to starboard of the centerline. The head of the boom is 105' above the base line and the center of gravity of the lift when stowed on deck will be 42' above the base line. As the jumbo boom takes the strain the ship lists to 5°. What is the GM with the cargo stowed? 4.11 4.54 4.98 5.13
You are making a heavy lift with the jumbo boom. Your vessel displaces 8390 T. The 40 ton weight is on the pier and its center is 55' to starboard of the centerline. The head of the boom is 110' above the base line and the center of gravity of the lift when stowed on deck will be 45' above the base line. As the jumbo boom takes the strain the ship lists to 3.5°. What is the GM with the cargo stowed? 4.58 feet 4.27 feet 3.93 feet 3.68 feet
You are making a heavy lift with the jumbo boom. Your vessel displaces 8530 T. The 40-ton weight is on the pier and its center is 65' to starboard of the centerline. The head of the boom is 115' above the base line and the center of gravity of the lift when stowed on deck will be 50' above the base line. As the jumbo boom takes the strain the ship lists to 5°. What is the GM with the cargo stowed? 2.96 ft 3.18 ft 3.46 ft 3.77 ft
You are making a heavy lift with the jumbo boom. Your vessel displaces 7940 T. The 45-ton weight is on the pier and its center is 60' to starboard of the centerline. The head of the boom is 110' above the base line and the center of gravity of the lift when stowed on deck will be 50' above the base line. As the jumbo boom takes the strain the ship lists to 4.5°. What is the GM with the cargo stowed? 4.82 4.64 4.3 3.97
You are making a heavy lift with the jumbo boom. Your vessel displaces 18,000 T. The 50-ton weight is on the pier, and its center is 75 feet to starboard of the centerline. The head of the boom is 112 feet above the base line, and the center of gravity of the lift when stowed on deck will be 56 feet above the base line. As the jumbo boom takes the strain, the ship lists 3.5°. What is the GM when the cargo is stowed? 3.19 feet 3.24 feet 3.40 feet 3.56 feet
You are loading in a port subject to the tropical load line mark and bound for a port subject to the winter load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming one day, and you will enter the winter zone after a total of eight days. You will consume 36 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.002, and the TPI is 47. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage?
Reference Table BL-0005 below.
71.0 inches 72.7 inches 79.5 inches 81.0 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the tropical load line mark and bound for a port subject to the winter load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming eleven days, and you will enter the winter zone after a total of fourteen days. You will consume 36 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.025, and the average TPI is 51. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage?
Reference Table BL-0006 below.
75.0 inches 76.0 inches 79.5 inches 81.0 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the winter load line mark and bound for a port subject to the tropical load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming four days, and you will enter the tropical zone after a total of seven days. You will consume 38 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.004, and the average TPI is 72. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage?
 Reference Table BL-0007 below.
85 inches 90 inches 92 inches 94 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the tropical load line mark and bound for a port subject to the winter load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming one and one-half days, and you will enter the winter zone after a total of six days. You will consume 29 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.006, and the average TPI is 43. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage?
Reference Table BL-0008 below.
79.5 inches 76.5 inches 75.0 inches 72.5 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the winter load line mark and bound for a port subject to the tropical load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming four days, and you will enter the tropical zone after a total of twelve days. You will consume 39 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.025, and the average TPI is 49. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage?
 Reference Table BL-0010 below.
90 inches 87 inches 80 inches 77 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the tropical load line mark and bound for a port subject to the winter load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming one day, and you will enter the winter zone after a total of eleven days. You will consume 33 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.004, and the average TPI is 46. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage?
Reference Table BL-0011 below.
85 inches 82 inches 80 inches 78 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the tropical load line mark and bound for a port subject to the winter load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming six days. You will enter the winter zone after an additional three days. You will consume 28 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.020, and the average TPI is 46. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage?
Reference Table BL-0012 below.
61.4 inches 64.5 inches 70.6 inches 77.5 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the winter load line mark and bound for a port subject to the tropical load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming four days, and you will enter the tropical zone after a total of twelve days. You will consume 31 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.000, and the average TPI is 46. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage?
 Reference Table BL-0013 below.
78 inches 74 inches 70 inches 68 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the tropical load line mark and bound for a port subject to the winter load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming eight days, and you will enter the winter zone after a total of ten days. You will consume 31 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.016, and the average TPI is 41. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage?
Reference Table BL-0015 below.
72 inches 70 inches 68 inches 64 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the tropical load line mark and bound for a port subject to the winter load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming four days, and you will enter the winter zone after a total of nine days. You will consume 29 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.008, and the average TPI is 53. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage?
Reference Table BL-0016 below.
72.5 inches 75.0 inches 77.0 inches 80.0 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the tropical load line mark and bound for a port subject to the summer load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming ten days. You will consume 33 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.021, and the average TPI is 51. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage?
Reference Table BL-0017 below.
76 inches 74 inches 73 inches 72 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the summer load line mark and bound for a port subject to the winter load line mark. You will enter the winter zone after steaming four days. You will consume 35 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.0083, and the average TPI is 65. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage?
Reference Table BL-0018 below.
74 inches 78 inches 80 inches 86 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the tropical load line mark and bound for a port subject to the summer load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming four days. You will consume 41 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.000 and the average TPI is 55. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage?
Reference Table BL-0019 below.
55 inches 49 inches 44 inches 41 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the winter load line mark and bound for a port subject to the summer load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming six days. You will consume 32 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.005, and the average TPI is 65. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage?
Reference Table BL-0020 below.
93 inches 90 inches 81 inches 70 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the tropical load line mark and bound for a port subject to the summer load line mark. You will enter the summer zone after steaming two days. You will consume 28 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.020, and the average TPI is 55. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage? Reference Table BL-0021 below. 62 inches 66 inches 70 inches 74 inches
You are loading in a port subject to the summer load line mark and bound for a port subject to the tropical load line mark. You will enter the tropical zone after steaming four days. You will consume 33 tons of fuel, water, and stores per day. The hydrometer reading at the loading pier is 1.006, and the average TPI is 66. What is the minimum freeboard required at the start of the voyage?
Reference Table BL-0022 below.
78 inches 82 inches 86 inches 88 inches
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. You are carrying the load show in table ST-0002 below. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo?
1.50 feet 1.96 feet 2.21 feet 2.78 feet
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. You are carrying the load show in table ST-0003 below. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 2.15 feet 1.83 feet 1.64 feet 1.19 feet
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. You are carrying the load show in table ST-0004 below. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 3.6 feet 4.2 feet 4.4 feet 4.9 feet
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. You are carrying the load show in table ST-0015 below. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 1.76 feet 1.97 feet 2.21 feet 2.32 feet
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. You are carrying the load show in table ST-0018 below. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 3.75 feet 3.02 feet 2.22 feet 0.83 foot
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. You are carrying the load show in table ST-0019 below. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 0.96 foot 1.45 feet 1.96 feet 2.96 feet
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. You are carrying the load show in table ST-0020 below. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 2.32 feet 2.21 feet 1.97 feet 1.76 feet
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. You are carrying the load show in table ST-0027 below. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 2.15 feet 2.05 feet 1.85 feet 1.52 feet
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. You are carrying the load show in table ST-0030 below. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 1.20 feet 1.64 feet 2.26 feet 3.00 feet
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. You are carrying the load show in table ST-0036 below. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 2.45 feet 1.95 feet 1.05 feet 0.90 foot
You are on a supply run to an offshore drilling rig. You are carrying the load show in table ST-0039 below. What is the height above the main deck of the center of gravity of the cargo? 2.23 feet 1.93 feet 1.82 feet 1.38 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM.
ST-0040
Available GM 6.9 ft Available GM 5.3 ft Available GM 4.1 ft Available GM 3.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0046 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 5.0 ft Available GM 5.4 ft Available GM 6.1 ft Available GM 6.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0052 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 6.9 ft Available GM 5.3 ft Available GM 4.1 ft Available GM 3.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0054 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 6.8 ft Available GM 5.4 ft Available GM 4.1 ft Available GM 3.6 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0056 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 6.8 ft Available GM 5.4 ft Available GM 4.1 ft Available GM 3.6 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0059 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM Available GM 3.2 ft Available GM 3.9 ft Available GM 4.8 ft Available GM 5.3 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0060 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 5.26 ft Available GM 4.24 ft Available GM 4.11 ft Available GM 4.01 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0065 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 5.0 ft Available GM 5.4 ft Available GM 6.1 ft Available GM 6.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0068 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 5.26 ft Available GM 4.24 ft Available GM 4.11 ft Available GM 4.01 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0069 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 4.2 ft Available GM 3.9 ft Available GM 3.7 ft Available GM 3.5 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0071 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 6.3 ft Available GM 5.7 ft Available GM 5.3 ft Available GM 4.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0074 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 4.3 ft Available GM 4.1 ft Available GM 3.9 ft Available GM 3.6 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0078 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 3.8 ft Available GM 3.6 ft Available GM 3.3 ft Available GM 3.1 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0080 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 3.8 ft Available GM 3.5 ft Available GM 3.2 ft Available GM 2.9 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0088 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 4.01 ft Available GM 4.16 ft Available GM 4.69 ft Available GM 4.81 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0096 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 4.07 ft Available GM 4.60 ft Available GM 4.69 ft Available GM 4.81 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0108 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 4.81 ft Available GM 4.69 ft Available GM 4.60 ft Available GM 4.28 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0121 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 3.51 ft Available GM 3.60 ft Available GM 3.98 ft Available GM 4.28 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0139 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 3.5 ft Available GM 3.9 ft Available GM 4.3 ft Available GM 4.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0149 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 3.0 ft Available GM 3.7 ft Available GM 4.0 ft Available GM 4.2 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0181 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 2.8 ft Available GM 3.2 ft Available GM 3.5 ft Available GM 3.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0182 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 2.4 ft Available GM 3.2 ft Available GM 3.5 ft Available GM 3.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0183 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 2.8 ft Available GM 3.2 ft Available GM 3.5 ft Available GM 3.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0184 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 2.8 ft Available GM 3.2 ft Available GM 3.5 ft Available GM 3.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0185 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 2.8 ft Available GM 3.2 ft Available GM 3.5 ft Available GM 3.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0186 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 4.1 ft Available GM 4.3 ft Available GM 4.7 ft Available GM 5.1 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0188 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 4.1 ft Available GM 4.3 ft Available GM 4.7 ft Available GM 5.1 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0189 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 4.1 ft Available GM 4.3 ft Available GM 4.7 ft Available GM 5.1 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0190 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 4.1 ft Available GM 4.3 ft Available GM 4.7 ft Available GM 5.1 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to sail with the load shown in table ST-0192 below. Use Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the available GM. Available GM 4.3 ft Available GM 4.7 ft Available GM 5.1 ft Available GM 5.5 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown in table ST-0006 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts.
FWD 23'-03", AFT 27'- 00" FWD 23'-07", AFT 26'- 07" FWD 24'-01", AFT 26'- 02" FWD 24'-06", AFT 25'- 10"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 28'-04", AFT 31'-10". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated in table ST-0007 below. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 29'-01", AFT 31'- 04" FWD 29'-05", AFT 31'- 00" FWD 29'-08", AFT 30'- 09" FWD 29'-11", AFT 30'- 07"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD28'-04", AFT 30'-11". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated in table ST-0009 below. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 29'-01", AFT 30'- 10" FWD 29'-03", AFT 30'- 08" FWD 29'-07", AFT 30'- 08" FWD 29'-08", AFT 30'- 06"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 28'-08", AFT 29'-05". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated in table ST-0012 below. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts.
ST-0012
{{{
Load 225 tons       110 ft fwd of amidships
Discharge 120 tons   37 ft fwd of amidships
Load 125 tons        30 ft aft of amidships
Load 75 tons        200 ft aft of amidships}}}
FWD 28'-10", AFT 29'- 04" FWD 29'-02", AFT 29'- 07" FWD 29'-04", AFT 29'- 04" FWD 29'-05", AFT 29'- 08"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD28'-08", AFT 29'-05". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated in table ST-0013 below. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts.
ST-0013
{{{
Discharge 120 tons    145 feet fwd of amidships
Load 160 tons          87 feet fwd of amidships
Discharge 85 tons      50 feet fwd of amidships
Discharge 100 tons     30 feet aft of amidships}}}
FWD 28'-09", AFT 29'- 00" FWD 28'-07", AFT 29'- 01" FWD 28'-05", AFT 29'- 08" FWD 28'-04", AFT 29'- 05"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown in table ST-0016 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts FWD 23'-03", AFT 27'- 00" FWD 23'-07", AFT 26'- 07" FWD 24'-01", AFT 26'- 02" FWD 24'-06", AFT 25'- 10"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown in table ST-0017 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 26'-09", AFT 28'- 00" FWD 27'-00", AFT 27'- 10" FWD 27'-03", AFT 27'- 07" FWD 27'-06", AFT 27'- 04"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown in table ST-0024 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 26'-06", AFT 28'- 10" FWD 26'-10", AFT 28'- 05" FWD 27'-00", AFT 28'- 03" FWD 27'-03", AFT 28'- 00"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown in table ST-0061 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 22'-02", AFT 25'- 08" FWD 21'-07", AFT 26'- 03" FWD 20'-11", AFT 26'- 09" FWD 20'-09", AFT 26'- 11"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 21'-06.5", AFT 23'-05.4". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated in table ST-0072 below. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 21'-07.1", AFT 23'-08.9" FWD 21'-05.9", AFT 23'-01.9" FWD 21'-03.0", AFT 23'-04.8" FWD 21'-10.0", AFT 23'-06.0"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 19'-06.6", AFT 20'-05.6". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated in table ST-0079 below. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of The Stability Data Reference book to determine the final drafts. FWD 20'-06", AFT 21'- 02" FWD 18'-06", AFT 19'- 09" FWD 18'-10", AFT 20'- 05" FWD 20'-03", AFT 21'- 05"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 28'-08", AFT 29'-05'. Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated in table ST-0081 below.. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 28'-11", AFT 28'- 11" FWD 29'-01", AFT 28'- 09" FWD 29'-03", AFT 28'- 07" FWD 29'-05", AFT 28'- 05"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown in table ST-0082 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 26'-02", AFT 26'- 08" FWD 25'-09", AFT 27'- 02" FWD 25'-03", AFT 28'- 09" FWD 24'-11", AFT 29'- 11"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown in table ST-0084 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 27'-01", AFT 25'- 08" FWD 29'-09", AFT 25'- 09" FWD 25'-09", AFT 30'- 05" FWD 25'-06", AFT 30'- 00"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 21'-09.5", AFT 22'-09.5". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated in table ST-0087 below. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 21'-06.3", AFT 22'-06.6" FWD 21'-11.3", AFT 23'-01.8" FWD 22'-06.6", AFT 21'-06.9" FWD 23'-00.2", AFT 22'-00.4"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 21'-10.6", AFT 22'-11.6". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated in table ST-0089 below. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 22'-00.1", AFT 23'-00.1" FWD 21'-11.0", AFT 23'-01.2" FWD 21'-10.0", AFT 22'-10.0" FWD 21'-08.9", AFT 22'-11.1"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown in table ST-0090 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 17'-06", AFT 24'- 03" FWD 19'-03", AFT 22'- 06" FWD 17'-01", AFT 24'- 08" FWD 21'-04", AFT 19'- 07"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 28'-04", AFT 30'-08". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated in table ST-0092 below.. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 29'-01", AFT 30'- 01" FWD 29'-03", AFT 29'- 11" FWD 29'-05", AFT 29'- 09" FWD 29'-07", AFT 29'- 07"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown in table ST-0094 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 26'-03", AFT 27'- 08" FWD 26'-08", AFT 25'- 07" FWD 25'-06", AFT 26'- 11" FWD 26'-11", AFT 25'- 06"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 28'-04", AFT 29'-10". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated in table ST-0102 below.. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 27'-01", AFT 29'- 11" FWD 27'-03", AFT 29'- 09" FWD 27'-05", AFT 29'- 07" FWD 27'-07", AFT 29'- 05"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 29'-06", AFT 29'-02". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated in table ST-0110 below.. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 29'-07", AFT 29'- 08" FWD 29'-05", AFT 29'- 10" FWD 29'-03", AFT 30'- 00" FWD 29'-01", AFT 30'- 02"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown in table ST-0112 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 25'-07", AFT 27'- 01" FWD 25'-02", AFT 27'- 06" FWD 24'-10", AFT 27'- 10" FWD 24'-08", AFT 28'- 00"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown in table ST-0113 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 18'-05", AFT 21'- 05" FWD 18'-00", AFT 21'- 10" FWD 18'-06", AFT 22'- 01" FWD 17'-10", AFT 22'- 00"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 18'-05", AFT 20'-11". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated in table ST-0114  below.. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 18'-07", AFT 20'- 11" FWD 18'-09", AFT 20'- 09" FWD 18'-11", AFT 20'- 07" FWD 19'-01", AFT 20'- 05"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown in table ST-0115 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 25'-02", AFT 29'- 10" FWD 25'-06", AFT 29'- 06" FWD 27'-10", AFT 26'- 02" FWD 29'-11", AFT 25'- 04"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown in table ST-0117 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 17'-11", AFT 22'- 07" FWD 17'-09", AFT 23'- 01" FWD 17'-05", AFT 23'- 04" FWD 17'-02", AFT 23'- 04"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER will sail with the load shown in table ST-0120 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the drafts. FWD 26'-09", AFT 28'- 05" FWD 26'-05", AFT 28'- 07" FWD 26'-04", AFT 28'- 10" FWD 26'-00", AFT 29'- 00"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 18'-06", AFT 21'-10". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated in table ST-0123 below.. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 18'-06", AFT 21'- 06" FWD 18'-08", AFT 21'- 04" FWD 18'-10", AFT 21'- 02" FWD 19'-00", AFT 21'- 00"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 17'-10", AFT 19'-06". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated in table ST-0134 below.. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 16'-10", AFT 21'- 02" FWD 17'-00", AFT 21'- 00" FWD 17'-02", AFT 20'- 10" FWD 17'-04", AFT 20'- 08"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 18'-10", AFT 18'-06". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated in table ST-0140 below.. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 18'-00", AFT 19'- 06" FWD 18'-02", AFT 19'- 04" FWD 18'-04", AFT 19'- 02" FWD 18'-06", AFT 19'- 00"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 18'-06", AFT 20'-10". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated in table ST-0152 below.. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 18'-11", AFT 20'- 02" FWD 19'-01", AFT 20'- 00" FWD 19'-03", AFT 19'- 10" FWD 19'-05", AFT 19'- 08"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER arrived in port with drafts of: FWD 19'-10.5", AFT 22'-11.6". Cargo was loaded and discharged as indicated in table ST-0154 below. Use sheet 2 in the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final drafts. FWD 20'-01.4", AFT 23'-00.6" FWD 19'-07.6", AFT 22'-10.4" FWD 19'-09.3", AFT 22'-08.7" FWD 19'-11.7", AFT 23'-02.5"
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 14'-06", AFT 17'-00". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown in table ST-0085. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 0.52 foot 0.70 foot 0.84 foot 1.10 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 11'-01", AFT 15'-01". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown in table ST-0086. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction.
ST-0086
{{{
DB 1  CL  48.2 DB 6  CL 242.3
DB 1A CL  81.9 DB 7  P   94.6
DB 2  P   71.2 DB 7  S   94.6
DB 2  S   71.2 DT 1  CL 125.3
DB 3  CL 227.6 DT 1A CL 257.6
DB 3  P   55.6 DT 2  P   80.0
DB 3  S   55.6 DT 2  S   80.0
DB 4  CL 224.1 DT 6  P  201.2
DB 4  P  128.1 DT 6  S  201.2
DB 4  S  128.1 DT 7  P  128.8
DT 7  S  128.8}}}
0.68 foot 0.85 foot 0.97 foot 1.30 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 11'-01", AFT 15'-01". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown in table ST-0091. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.20 feet 0.92 foot 0.73 foot 0.61 foot
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 18'-06", AFT 20'-06". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown in table ST-0099. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.10 feet 0.91 foot 0.72 foot 0.68 foot
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 11'-01", AFT 15'-01". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown in table ST-0103. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 0.87 foot 0.98 foot 1.14 feet 1.25 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 11'-01", AFT 14'-07". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown in table ST-0158 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.17 foot 0.91 foot 1.30 feet 1.06 foot
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 12'-07", AFT 16'-01". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown in table ST-0167 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.30 feet 1.07 foot 0.96 foot 0.82 foot
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 21'-04", AFT 26'-04". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown in table ST-0170 below Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 0.54 ft 0.62 ft 0.80 ft 0.85 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 19'-00", AFT 24'-00". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown in table ST-0171 Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 0.62 foot 0.80 foot 0.85 foot 0.99 foot
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 20'-04", AFT 23'-06". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown in table ST-0172 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 0.62 foot 0.80 foot 0.85 foot 0.99 foot
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 14'-04", AFT 18'-08". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown in table ST-0173. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.05 feet 1.15 feet 1.25 feet 1.31 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 15'-05", AFT 21'-03". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown in table ST-0174. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.05 feet 1.15 feet 1.25 feet 1.31 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 17'-05", AFT 19'-07". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown in table ST-0175. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 0.62 foot 0.80 foot 0.85 foot 0.99 foot
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 14'-04", AFT 18'-08". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown in table ST-0176. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.05 feet 1.15 feet 1.25 feet 1.31 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 21'-04", AFT 26'-04". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 0.62 foot 0.80 foot 0.85 foot 0.99 foot
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 17'-06", AFT 20'-04". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown in table ST-0178. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction 1.05 feet 1.15 feet 1.25 feet 1.31 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 13'-10", AFT 16'-04". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown in table ST-0179. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.30 feet 1.17 foot 1.01 foot 0.91 foot
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 14'-04", AFT 17'-06". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown in table ST-0180. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.15 feet 1.25 feet 1.31 feet 1.48 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to bunker with drafts of FWD 13'-10", AFT 16'-04". After all bunkers are on board, soundings indicate the tonnages shown in table ST-0187. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the free surface correction. 1.30 feet 1.07 foot 0.96 foot 0.73 foot
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed in table ST-0008 below. There is already 4184 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 27.8 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 25.8 feet KG 26.6 feet KG 27.2 feet KG 28.0 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed in table ST-0022 below. There is already 2685 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 27.4 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 25.4 feet KG 26.0 feet KG 26.6 feet KG 27.2 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed in table ST-0028 below. There is already 3315 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 27.0 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 26.2 feet KG 27.4 feet KG 28.6 feet KG 30.1 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed in table ST-0031 below. There is already 4145 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 25.5 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 25.0 feet KG 25.6 feet KG 26.2 feet KG 26.8 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed in table ST-0035 below. There is already 3224 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 29.8 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 27.2 feet KG 27.8 feet KG 28.4 feet KG 29.0 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed in table ST-0038 below. There is already 6422 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 26.6 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 24.9 feet KG 25.5 feet KG 26.1 feet KG 28.9 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed in table ST-0042 below. There is already 2464 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 27.3 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 27.0 feet KG 27.8 feet KG 28.6 feet KG 29.8 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed in table ST-0043 below. There is already 3284 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 26.4 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 25.0 feet KG 25.5 feet KG 26.1 feet KG 26.7 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed in table ST-0050 below. There is already 2865 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 27.8 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 26.2 feet KG 27.4 feet KG 28.5 feet KG 29.5 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed in table ST-0055 below. There is already 3684 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 28.4 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 27.0 feet KG 27.6 feet KG 28.2 feet KG 28.8 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0057 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 7.7 feet 9.1 feet 9.9 feet 10.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0063 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 4.0 feet 5.6 feet 6.0 feet 6.8 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0064 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 3.9 feet 4.3 feet 4.7 feet 5.1 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0067 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 4.0 feet 5.6 feet 6.0 feet 6.8 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0075 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 4.0 feet 5.6 feet 6.0 feet 6.8 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0077 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 4.0 feet 5.6 feet 6.0 feet 6.8 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0083 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 7.7 feet 9.1 feet 9.9 feet 10.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0097 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 7.7 feet 9.1 feet 9.9 feet 10.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0104 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 7.7 feet 9.1 feet 9.9 feet 10.7 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0106 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 3.9 feet 4.3 feet 4.7 feet 5.1 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed in table ST-0125 below. There is already 4236 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 27.2 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 26.9 feet KG 27.3 feet KG 27.8 feet KG 28.1 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0127 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 7.9 feet 7.3 feet 6.4 feet 4.3 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0129 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 6.1 feet 5.8 feet 5.4 feet 4.9 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed in table ST-0130 below. There is already 4260 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 25.8 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 24.6 feet KG 25.0 feet KG 25.4 feet KG 25.9 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed in table ST-0131 below. There is already 3485 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 24.4 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 25.1 feet KG 25.6 feet KG 26.0 feet KG 26.5 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed in table ST-0132 below. There is already 3175 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 25.8 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 26.8 feet KG 27.3 feet KG 28.2 feet KG 28.5 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0133 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 5.1 feet 4.9 feet 2.9 feet 2.5 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is ready to load the cargo listed in table ST-0135 below. There is already 6280 tons of cargo on board with a KG of 25.5 feet. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final KG of all the cargo after loading is completed. KG 25.3 feet KG 25.7 feet KG 26.0 feet KG 27.1 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0136 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 2.8 feet 4.6 feet 6.8 feet 7.1 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0142 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the KG of the liquid load. 2.6 feet 2.8 feet 3.1 feet 4.3 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0093 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG-FP of the liquid load. 286.1 ft 282.7 ft 278.6 ft 272.4 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0095 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG-FP of the liquid load. 280.2 ft 284.1 ft 285.3 ft 286.2 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0098 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG-FP of the liquid load. 262.3 ft 264.9 ft 268.1 ft 270.3 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0100 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG-FP of the liquid load. 271.2 ft 260.3 ft 251.9 ft 247.2 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 6450 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 274.46 feet. See table ST-0101 below for the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 269.8 feet LCG-FP 272.6 feet LCG-FP 266.5 feet LCG-FP 263.8 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 5480 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 272.20 feet. See table ST-0105 below for the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 272.2 feet LCG-FP 268.3 feet LCG-FP 265.1 feet LCG-FP 263.4 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 4850 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 275.72 feet. See table ST-0107 below for the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 270.8 feet LCG-FP 269.2 feet LCG-FP 267.6 feet LCG-FP 266.7 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 6048 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 270.89 feet. See table ST-0109 below for the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of the Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 263.4 feet LCG-FP 266.6 feet LCG-FP 267.8 feet LCG-FP 269.4 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 6080 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 270.71 feet. See table ST-0111 below for the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 267.6 feet LCG-FP 266.7 feet LCG-FP 269.2 feet LCG-FP 270.8 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0116 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG-FP of the liquid load. 231.0 ft 234.3 ft 244.6 ft 251.5 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0118 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG-FP of the liquid load. 271.2 ft 288.8 ft 292.3 ft 307.2 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0119 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG-FP of the liquid load. 270.6 ft 261.2 ft 250.5 ft 246.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0122 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG-FP of the liquid load. 271.2 ft 291.0 ft 288.8 ft 305.3 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0137 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG-FP of the liquid load. 271.2 ft 288.8 ft 294.4 ft 305.3 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0145 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG-FP of the liquid load. 226.9 ft 238.3 ft 252.4 ft 268.8 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0148 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG-FP of the liquid load. 229.8 ft 234.3 ft 246.8 ft 251.5 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0150 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG-FP of the liquid load. 228.8 ft 238.3 ft 252.4 ft 266.5 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0155 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG-FP of the liquid load. 229.8 ft 236.7 ft 244.6 ft 251.5 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0156 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG-FP of the liquid load. 229.8 ft 234.3 ft 244.6 ft 253.5 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the liquid load shown in table ST-0157 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the LCG-FP of the liquid load. 273.5 ft 288.8 ft 292.3 ft 305.3 ft
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 4850 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 279.84 feet. See table ST-0159 below for the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 267.7 feet LCG-FP 268.4 feet LCG-FP 269.2 feet LCG-FP 270.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 5486 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 277.84 feet. See table ST-0160 below for the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 271.2 feet LCG-FP 272.1 feet LCG-FP 273.6 feet LCG-FP 274.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 6584 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 277.84 feet. See table ST-0161 below for the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 271.2 feet LCG-FP 272.1 feet LCG-FP 273.6 feet LCG-FP 274.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 6285 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 272.45 feet. See table ST-0162 below for the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 271.2 feet LCG-FP 272.1 feet LCG-FP 273.6 feet LCG-FP 274.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 5577 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 275.55 feet. See table ST-0163 below for the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 271.2 feet LCG-FP 272.1 feet LCG-FP 273.6 feet LCG-FP 274.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 4824 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 277.45 feet. See table ST-0164 below for the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 267.7 feet LCG-FP 268.4 feet LCG-FP 269.2 feet LCG-FP 270.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 7240 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 273.20 feet. See table ST-0165 below for the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 271.2 feet LCG-FP 272.1 feet LCG-FP 273.6 feet LCG-FP 275.3 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 3245 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 272.20 feet. See table ST-0166 below for the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 267.7 feet LCG-FP 268.4 feet LCG-FP 269.2 feet LCG-FP 270.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 3885 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 278.45 feet. See table ST-0168 below for the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 267.7 feet LCG-FP 268.4 feet LCG-FP 269.2 feet LCG-FP 270.6 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 5540 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 272.20 feet. See table ST-0169 below for the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 266.5 feet LCG-FP 267.8 feet LCG-FP 268.4 feet LCG-FP 269.2 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 5480 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 274.46 feet. See table ST-0191 below for the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 271.79 feet LCG-FP 272.87 feet LCG-FP 274.04 feet LCG-FP 275.13 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 6048 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 270.71 feet. See table ST-0193 below for the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 267.03 feet LCG-FP 267.92 feet LCG-FP 268.66 feet LCG-FP 269.94 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 6450 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 270.89 feet. See table ST-0194 below for the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 267.12 feet LCG-FP 268.48 feet LCG-FP 270.97 feet LCG-FP 273.06 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has on board 4850 tons of cargo with an LCG-FP of 274.46 feet. See table ST-0195 below for the distribution of the cargo to be loaded. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the final LCG-FP of the cargo. LCG-FP 271.23 feet LCG-FP 270.96 feet LCG-FP 269.52 feet LCG-FP 267.88 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown in table ST-0001 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 338 tons 309 tons 281 tons 263 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown in table ST-0005 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 189 tons 174 tons 158 tons No loading required
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown in table ST-0010 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 1292 tons 1248 tons 1211 tons 1172 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown in table ST-0011 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 696 tons 520 tons 473 tons 444 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 09'-00", AFT 15'-11". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items shown in table ST-0014 below will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 2.82 feet 2.97 feet 3.15 feet 3.24 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 09'-00", AFT 15'-11.5". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items shown in table ST-0021 below will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 1.80 feet 2.05 feet 1.89 feet 1.98 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 09'-00", AFT 15'-11". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items shown in table ST-0023 below will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 2.62 feet 2.82 feet 2.97 feet 3.15 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 09'-00", AFT 15'-11.5". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items shown in table ST-0025 below will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 1.89 feet 1.98 feet 1.80 feet 2.05 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 09'-00", AFT 15'-11.5". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items shown in table ST-0026 below will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 2.38 feet 2.05 feet 2.27 feet 2.49 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 09'-00", AFT 15'-11". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items shown in table ST-0029 below will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 2.62 feet 2.82 feet 2.97 feet 3.15 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 09'-00", AFT 15'-11". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items shown in table ST-0032 below will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 2.82 feet 2.62 feet 3.15 feet 2.97 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 09'-00", AFT 15'-11.5". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items shown in table ST-0033 below will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 1.82 feet 2.05 feet 1.96 feet 2.17 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 09'-00", AFT 15'-11". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items shown in table ST-0034 below will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 2.97 feet 3.15 feet 2.62 feet 2.82 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 08'-04", AFT 16'-08". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items shown in table ST-0037 below will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 1.91 feet 2.09 feet 2.21 feet 2.48 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 09'-10", AFT 15'-08". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items shown in table ST-0041 below will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 1.91 feet 2.09 feet 2.21 feet 2.48 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 10'-04", AFT 14'-08". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items shown in table ST-0045 below will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 1.91 feet 2.09 feet 2.21 feet 2.48 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 8'-04", AFT 15'-08". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items shown in table ST-0047 below will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 1.77 feet 1.91 feet 2.09 feet 2.21 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown in table ST-0048 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 280 tons 395 tons 750 tons 990 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown in table ST-0049 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 395 tons 530 tons 750 tons 990 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown in table ST-0051 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 395 tons 530 tons 750 tons 990 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown in table ST-0053 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 395 tons 530 tons 750 tons 990 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown in table ST-0058 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 395 tons 530 tons 750 tons 990 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown in table ST-0062 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 1171.5 tons 1311.0 tons 1503.0 tons 1710.5 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown in table ST-0066 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 1171.5 tons 1311.0 tons 1503.0 tons 1710.5 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown in table ST-0070 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 1171.5 tons 1311.0 tons 1503.0 tons 1710.5 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown in table ST-0073 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 1171.5 tons 1311.0 tons 1503.0 tons 1710.5 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown in table ST-0076 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 1171.5 tons 1311.0 tons 1503.0 tons 1912.5 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown in table ST-0124 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 444 tons 644 tons 1044 tons 1263 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown in table ST-0126 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 595 tons 870 tons 1200 tons 1350 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown in table ST-0128 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 1920 tons 1280 tons 895 tons 720 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 08'-11.5", AFT 15'-11.5". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items shown in table ST-0138 below will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 2.15 feet 1.95 feet 2.05 feet 1.75 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown in table ST-0141 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 1220 tons 840 tons 460 tons 344 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown in table ST-0143 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 451 tons 1126 tons 1451 tons 1726 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 08'-11.5", AFT 15'-11.5". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items shown in table ST-0144 below will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 2.80 feet 3.00 feet 2.90 feet 3.15 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER is loaded with the cargo shown in table ST-0146 below. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the amount of liquid loading required in the double bottom tanks to meet a one compartment standard. 920 tons 1120 tons 1245 tons 1545 tons
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 08'-11.5", AFT 15'-11.5". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items shown in table ST-0147 below will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 2.00 feet 1.50 feet 3.10 feet 2.45 feet
The SS AMERICAN MARINER has the following drafts: FWD 08'-11.5", AFT 15'-11.5". Upon completion of loading and bunkering the items shown in table ST-0153 below will be on board. Use the white pages of The Stability Data Reference Book to determine the minimum GM required to meet a one compartment standard. 1.80 feet 1.65 feet 2.20 feet 2.00 feet
Where are the draft marks required to be displayed on a ship? Area of water line near stem and stern Deep tanks Voids Midships near the waterline
What is the center around which a vessel trims called? the tipping center the center of gravity the center of buoyancy the turning center
When the forward drafts and the after drafts are averaged, which of the following describes the result? draft at the center of flotation mean of the calculated drafts true mean draft mean draft
How will the draft at the center of floatation change after transferring a weight forward on a vessel? it will increase it will decrease it will remain constant it will change, depending on the location of the LCG
What is the maximum mean draft to which a vessel may be safely loaded called? deep draft load line draft calculated draft mean draft
What is the difference between the initial trim and the trim after loading known as? final trim change of draft change of trim trim
For an upright vessel, draft is the vertical distance between the keel and the __________. amidships section waterline Plimsoll mark freeboard deck
Forces within a vessel may cause a difference between the starboard and port drafts. What is this difference called? trim heel list flotation
The wind has caused a difference between drafts starboard and port. This difference is known as which of the following? trim flotation list heel
What is the difference between the starboard and port drafts due to the wind or seas called? flotation trim list heel
What is the distance between the bottom of the hull and the waterline called? freeboard draft tonnage reserve buoyancy
What is the weight of the liquid displaced by a vessel floating in sea water equal to? reserve buoyancy total weight of the vessel displaced volume weight required to sink the vessel
The term displacement refers to which of the following? cubic capacity of a vessel gross tonnage of a vessel number of long tons of water displaced by a vessel afloat deadweight carrying capacity of a vessel
Which statement about the free surface effect is TRUE? It decreases in direct proportion to increasing specific gravity of the liquid in the tank. In practice, the correction is considered to be a virtual reduction of KG. It increases in direct proportion to the length of the tank times the breadth squared. It decreases at increased angles of heel due to pocketing when a tank is 90% full.
Which statement about the free surface correction is TRUE? It is decreased if the slack tank is below the KG of the vessel. It is added to GM at light drafts and subtracted at deep drafts. It is increased if the slack tank is not on the centerline. The correction decreases as the draft increases
Which statement about the free surface effect is TRUE? It has the same affect on initial stability whether the tank is 75% full or 25% full. The effect can be reduced by shifting weights vertically. The effect increases if the tank is off the centerline. The free surface effect usually increases at angles of heel above 25°.
Which statement about the free surface correction is TRUE? It is increased if the slack tank is not on the centerline. The correction decreases as the draft increases due to loading dry cargo. It is added to GM at light drafts and subtracted at deep drafts. It is decreased if the slack tank is below the KG of the vessel.
Which statement about free surface is TRUE? Pocketing occurs at small angles of inclination when a tank is 98% full. A partially filled space with 40% surface permeability will have greater free surface effect than one with 60% surface permeability. Cargo with a specific gravity of 1.05 has less free surface effect than a cargo with a specific gravity of 0.98. Pocketing increases the loss of GM due to free surface effect.
Which factor has the greatest effect on the value of the free surface correction? The specific gravity of the liquid in the tank The length of the tank The draft of the vessel The width of the tank
What does NOT affect the value of the free surface correction? Specific gravity of the liquid in the tank Registered tonnage Length of the tank Width of the tank
The most important figure in calculating the free surface constant of a tank carrying liquids is __________. length depth breadth displacement
The effects of free surface on a vessel's initial stability do NOT depend upon the __________. dimensions of the surface of the liquid specific gravity of the liquid in the tank volume of displacement of the vessel amount of liquid in slack tanks
The effect of free surface on initial stability depends upon __________. the vertical position of the liquid in the vessel the amount of liquid in the compartment the dimensions of the liquid surface and the vessel's displacement only the length of the compartment
A tank which carries liquid is dangerous to the stability of a vessel when it is __________. slack completely empty completely full low in the vessel
A tank which is NOT completely full or empty is called __________. elemental pressed slack inertial
Reducing the liquid free surfaces in a vessel reduces the __________. metacentric height waterplane area vessel's draft roll period
The correction to KG for longitudinal free surface effects for a vessel can be found by dividing the vessel's displacement into the __________. sum of the longitudinal free surface moments of the vessel sum of the vertical moments of the vessel longitudinal centerline of the vessel transverse free surface correction for the vessel
The correction to KG for transverse free surface effects may be found by dividing the vessel's displacement into the __________. transverse baseline of the vessel transverse free surface correction for the vessel sum of the transverse free surface moments of the vessel sum of the vertical moments of the vessel
To calculate the free surface correction, it is necessary to divide the free-surface moments by the __________. total displacement lightweight deadweight total weight of liquid loads
Increasing the number of slack liquid tanks has the effect of raising the __________. virtual height of the center of gravity metacentric height uncorrected KG maximum allowed KG
What is the principal danger from the liquid in a half full tank onboard a vessel? Rupturing of bulkheads from the shifting liquid Holing of the tank bottom from the weight of the shifting liquid Corrosion from the shifting liquid Loss of stability from free surface effect
A tank 36 ft. by 36 ft. by 6 ft. is filled with water to a depth of 5 ft. If a bulkhead is placed in the center of the tank running fore-and-aft along the 36-foot axis, how will the value of the moment of inertia of the free surface be affected? The moment of inertia would be 1/2 the original value. The moment of inertia would remain unchanged. The moment of inertia would be 1/4 its original value. None of the above
When displacement increases, the free surface moments of slack tanks __________. remain unchanged decrease are inversely proportional increase
When displacement increases, the free surface corrections for slack tanks __________. remain unchanged decrease increase are directly proportional
As the displacement of a vessel increases, the detrimental effect of free surface __________. decreases may increase or decrease depending on the fineness of the vessel's form remains the same increases
The free surface correction depends upon the dimensions of the surface of the free liquid and the __________. volume of liquid in the tank displacement of the vessel height of the center of gravity of the vessel location of the tank in the vessel
The free surface effects of a partially full liquid tank decrease with increased __________. placement of the tank above the keel size of the surface area in the tank displacement volume of the vessel density of the liquid
The effects of free surface on initial stability depend upon the dimensions of the surface of the free liquids and the __________. volume of displacement of the vessel height of the center of gravity of the vessel location of the tank in the vessel volume of liquid in the tank
Which statement about the free surface correction is TRUE? It is subtracted from the total longitudinal moments before dividing by displacement to find LCG. It is added to the uncorrected GM to arrive at the corrected available GM. It is obtained by dividing the free surface moments by 12 times the volume of displacement. It is obtained by dividing the total free surface by the total vertical moments.
The free surface effects of a partially full tank in a vessel increase with the __________. displacement volume of the vessel draft of the vessel surface area of the fluid in the tank height of the tank above the keel
A vessel is equipped with cross-connected deep tanks. In which situation should the cross-connection valve be closed? The tanks lie above the waterline and are filled. The tanks are partially filled with liquid cargo. The tanks are filled and lie below the waterline. The tanks are partially filled with dry cargo.
Which will improve stability? Pumping the bilges Loading cargo on deck Closing watertight doors Consuming fuel from a full tank
An upright vessel has negative GM. GM becomes positive at the angle of loll because the __________. free surface effects are reduced due to pocketing underwater volume of the hull is increased KG is reduced as the vessel seeks the angle of loll effective beam is increased causing BM to increase
At an angle of loll, the capsizing moment is __________. maximum zero positive negative
In small angle stability theory, the metacenter is located at the intersection of the inclined vertical centerline and a vertical line through __________. B G K F
In the absence of external forces, adding weight on one side of a floating vessel causes the vessel to __________. list until the center of buoyancy is aligned vertically with the center of gravity heel until the angle of loll is reached decrease draft at the center of flotation trim to the side opposite TCG until all moments are equal
A vessel with a large GM will __________. be subject to severe racking stresses be less likely to have cargo shift have a small amplitude of roll in heavy weather tend to ship water on deck in heavy weather
A vessel with a large GM will __________. be less likely to have cargo shift have less tendency to have synchronous rolling ride more comfortably have more resistance to listing in case of damage
A vessel with a large GM will __________. have a large amplitude of roll provide a comfortable ride for the crew and passengers be likely to have cargo shift in heavy weather have drier decks in heavy weather
A vessel with a large GM will __________. tend to ship water on deck in heavy weather be less likely to have cargo shift have a small amplitude of roll in heavy weather be subject to severe racking stresses
A vessel with a large GM will __________. be more subject to synchronous rolling have a smaller amplitude of roll in heavy weather provide an uncomfortable ride for personnel have a short rolling period
Addition of weight above the center of gravity of a vessel will ALWAYS __________. increase GM reduce initial stability increase righting moments All of the above.
A vessel's KG is determined by __________. dividing the total longitudinal moment summation by displacement subtracting LCF from LCB multiplying the MT1 by the longitudinal moments dividing the total vertical moment summation by displacement
A floating vessel will behave as if all of its weight is acting downward through the __________. metacenter center of flotation center of buoyancy center of gravity
The water in which a vessel floats provides vertical upward support. The point through which this support is assumed to act is known as the center of __________. flotation gravity effort buoyancy
In small-angle stability, when external forces exist, the buoyant force is assumed to act vertically upwards through the center of buoyancy and through the __________. metacenter metacentric height center of flotation center of gravity
A vessel behaves as if all of its weight is acting downward through the center of gravity, and all its support is acting upward through the __________. center of buoyancy keel tipping center amidships section
The value of the maximum righting arm depends on the position of the center of buoyancy and the __________. longitudinal center of gravity transverse center of gravity vertical location of the center of gravity downflooding angle
The upward pressure of displaced water is called __________. freeboard draft deadweight buoyancy
What abbreviation represents the height of the center of buoyancy? BM KB CB BK
Stability is determined by the relationship of the center of gravity and the __________. water depth keel center of flotation center of buoyancy
Stability is determined principally by the location of the center of gravity and the __________. center of buoyancy center of flotation keel aft perpendicular
Stability is determined principally by the location of two points in a vessel: The center of buoyancy and the __________. center of flotation center of gravity metacenter geometric center of the waterplane area
Stability is determined principally by the location of the point of application of two forces: the downward-acting gravity force and the __________. environmental force upward-acting buoyant force upward-acting weight force downward-acting weight force
Stability is determined principally by the location of the point of application of two forces: the upward-acting buoyant force and the __________. downward-acting weight force environmental force upward-acting weight force downward-acting buoyant force
The geometric center of the underwater volume is known as the __________. tipping center center of buoyancy center of gravity center of flotation
The center of buoyancy is located at the __________. center of gravity of the vessel corrected for free surface effects geometric center of the displaced volume intersection of the vertical centerline and line of action of the buoyant force geometric center of the waterplane area
The geometric center of the underwater volume of a floating vessel is the center of __________. buoyancy hydrodynamic forces gravity flotation
Buoyancy is a measure of the ship's __________. deadweight midships strength ability to float freeboard
The center of volume of the immersed portion of the hull is called the __________. center of flotation tipping center center of gravity center of buoyancy
The center of the underwater volume of a floating vessel is the __________. center of gravity of the vessel corrected for free surface effects center of flotation uncorrected height of the center of gravity of the vessel center of buoyancy
The center of flotation of a vessel is __________. the center of gravity of the water plane the center of volume of the immersed portion of the vessel that point at which all the vertical downward forces of weight are considered to be concentrated that point at which all the vertical upward forces of buoyancy are considered to be concentrated
The center of flotation of a vessel is the point in the waterplane __________. which is shown in the hydrostatic tables as VCB which, in the absence of external forces, is always vertically aligned with the center of gravity which coincides with the center of buoyancy about which the vessel lists and trims
With no environmental forces, the center of gravity of an inclined vessel is vertically aligned with the __________. center of flotation longitudinal centerline center of buoyancy original vertical centerline
In the absence of external forces, the center of buoyancy of an inclined vessel is vertically aligned directly below the __________. center of flotation center of gravity geometric center of the waterplane area amidships station
In the presence of external forces, the center of buoyancy of an inclined vessel is vertically aligned with the __________. metacenter center of flotation center of gravity keel
With no environmental forces, the center of gravity of an inclined vessel is vertically aligned directly above the __________. original vertical centerline center of buoyancy longitudinal centerline center of flotation
The geometric center of the waterplane area is called the __________. metacenter center of flotation center of buoyancy center of gravity
The center of flotation of a vessel is the geometric center of the __________. waterplane area above water volume underwater volume amidships section
In the absence of external forces, the center of gravity of a floating vessel is located directly in line with the __________. amidships geometric center of the displaced volume center of flotation metacenter
Stable equilibrium for a vessel means that the metacenter is __________. at a lower level than the baseline at amidships on the longitudinal centerline higher than the center of gravity
At all angles of inclination, the metacenter is __________. at the geometric center of the underwater volume at the intersection of the upright vertical centerline and the line of action of the buoyant force vertically above the center of gravity vertically above the center of buoyancy
In small-angle stability, when external forces exist, the buoyant force is assumed to act vertically upwards through the center of buoyancy and through the __________. metacentric height center of flotation metacenter center of gravity
In small angle stability, the metacentric height __________. is found in the hydrostatic tables for a level vessel is always positive is calculated by subtracting KG from KM multiplied by the displacement yields the righting moment
The principal danger from ice collecting on a vessel is the __________. decrease in capabilities of radar loss of stability adverse effect on trim decrease in displacement
Which of the following describes why topside icing, which is usually off-center, decreases vessel stability? it increases the draft it reduces the pocketing of free surface it increases the displacement it increases the height of the center of gravity
Topside icing that blocks freeing ports and scuppers __________. will cause water on deck to pocket and increase stability may decrease stability by increasing free surface effect due to water on deck is usually below the center of gravity and has little effect on stability increases the effective freeboard and increases the wind-heel affect
Topside icing decreases vessel stability because it increases __________. KG draft displacement free surface
At an angle of loll, the righting arm (GZ) is __________. maximum negative positive, but reflexive zero
At an angle of loll, the righting moment is __________. negative zero positive maximum
At all angles of inclination, the true measure of a vessel's stability is the __________. displacement inclining moment righting moment metacentric height
A vessel would be referred to as "tender" when the weight of the cargo is __________. concentrated low and the double bottoms are empty concentrated low and the double bottoms are full concentrated high and the double bottoms are empty evenly distributed vertically and the double bottoms are full
Aboard a vessel, multiplying a load's weight by the distance of the load's center of gravity from the centerline results in the load's __________. TCG transverse moment transverse free surface moment righting moment
Aboard a vessel, dividing the sum of the transverse moments by the total weight yields the vessel's __________. inclining moments righting moments vertical moments transverse position of the center of gravity
Aboard a vessel, dividing the sum of the vertical moments by the total weight yields the vessel's __________. inclining moments righting moments height of the center of gravity vertical moments
In illustration D001SA below, which item represents the righting arm? Angle MGZ BM GZ GM
The value of the righting arm at an angle of loll is __________. negative equal to GM zero positive
When inclined to an angle of list, the value of the righting arm is __________. maximum negative zero positive
The difference between the forward and aft drafts is __________. flotation list heel trim
A vessel is "listed" when it is __________. down by the stern down by the head inclined due to wind inclined due to off-center weight
A vessel is "listed" when it is __________. inclined due to an off-center weight down by the head inclined due to the wind down by the stern
If a vessel lists to port, the center of buoyancy will __________. stay in the same position move to starboard move to port move directly down
When a vessel is inclined by an external force, the __________. vessel's center of buoyancy shifts to the center of the vessel's underwater hull vessel's center of gravity shifts to the center of the vessel's underwater hull shape of the vessel's underwater hull remains the same vessel's mean draft increases
Your vessel has taken a slight list from off-center loading of material on deck. The __________. vessel may flop vessel is trimmed list should be easily removed mean draft is affected
Your vessel has just finished bunkering and has a small list due to improper distribution of the fuel oil. This list will cause __________. a decrease in reserve buoyancy the vessel to flop to port and starboard a decrease in the maximum draft None of the above
If your vessel has a list to port due to negative GM and off-center weight, the first corrective measure you should take is to __________. pump water from the port double-bottom to the starboard double-bottom move port-side main-deck cargo to the starboard side fill the starboard double-bottom pump water from the port double-bottom over the side
The difference between the starboard and port drafts caused by shifting a weight transversely is __________. list heel trim flotation
During cargo operations, your vessel develops a list due to the center of gravity rising above the transverse metacenter. To correct the list, you should __________. shift weight to the centerline add weight in the lower holds or double bottoms remove weight from the lower holds or double bottoms shift weight to the high side
Assuming an even transverse distribution of weight in a vessel, which condition could cause a list? Empty double-bottoms and lower holds, and a heavy deck cargo Having KG smaller than KM Flooding the forepeak to correct the vessel's trim Having a small positive righting arm
If your vessel will list with equal readiness to either side, the list is most likely caused by __________. negative GM excessive freeboard off-center weight pocketing of free surface
A vessel continually lists to one side and has a normal rolling period. Which statement is TRUE? The vessel has negative GM. The vessel has asymmetrical weight distribution. The center of gravity is on the centerline. The list can be corrected by reducing KM.
The static stability curve for a given vessel peaks at 34°. For this ship, the danger angle for a permanent list would be about __________. 8.5° 17° 34° 51°
If the cause of a sudden severe list or trim is negative initial stability, counter-flooding into empty tanks may cause which of the following? increase the righting moment decrease list increase the righting arm increase list
If the cause of a sudden severe list or trim is negative initial stability, counterflooding into empty tanks may __________. cause an increase in the righting arm bring the unit to an upright equilibrium position cause the unit to flop to a greater angle increase the righting moment
Before counterflooding to correct a list, you must be sure the list is due to which of the following choices? flooding off-center weight reserve buoyancy negative GM
Your vessel is listing because of a negative GM. To lower G below M, you should __________. deballast transfer weight to the high side ballast on the high side add weight symmetrically below G
A vessel has a strong wind on the port beam. This has the same effect on stability as __________. weight that is off-center to starboard increasing the trim reducing the freeboard increasing the draft
When a vessel is inclined at a small angle the center of buoyancy will __________. move toward the low side move toward the high side move to the height of the metacenter remain stationary
Movement of liquid in a tank when a vessel inclines causes an increase in __________. metacentric radius righting arm metacentric height natural rolling period
Your vessel rolls slowly and sluggishly. This indicates that the vessel __________. has poor stability has a greater draft forward than aft has off-center weights is taking on water
The original equilibrium position is always unstable when __________. KG exceeds maximum allowable limits metacentric height is negative free surfaces are excessive KM is higher than KG
In illustration D001SA below, what represents the metacentric height? BM GM GZ M
An unstable upright equilibrium position on a vessel means that the metacenter is __________. higher than the baseline at the same height as the center of gravity lower than the center of gravity on the longitudinal centerline
When the height of the metacenter is less than the height of the center of gravity of a vessel, the upright equilibrium position is __________. positive unstable stable neutral
When the height of the metacenter is the same as the height of the center of gravity of a vessel, the upright equilibrium position is __________. unstable negative neutral stable
When the height of the metacenter is greater than the height of the center of gravity, a vessel is in __________. neutral equilibrium negative equilibrium stable equilibrium unstable equilibrium
For small angles of inclination, if the KG were equal to the KM, then the vessel would have __________. negative stability maximum stability positive stability neutral stability
The original equilibrium position is stable when __________. KG exceeds maximum allowable limits metacentric radius is positive free surfaces are excessive metacentric height is positive
A neutral equilibrium position for a vessel means that the metacenter is __________. lower than the keel at the center of the waterplane area at the same height as the center of gravity exactly at midships
The point to which your vessel's center of gravity (G) may rise and still permit the vessel to have positive stability is called the __________. tipping center metacenter metacentric radius metacentric point
What is the definition of transverse metacenter? The distance between the actual center of gravity and the maximum center of gravity that will still allow a positive stability. The point to which G may rise and still permit the vessel to possess positive stability. The sum of the center of buoyancy and the center of gravity. The transverse shift of the center of buoyancy as a vessel rolls.
When the height of the metacenter is less than the height of the center of gravity, a vessel has which type of stability? Positive Stable Neutral Unstable
When the height of the metacenter is the same as the height of the center of gravity, the upright equilibrium position is __________. stable unstable neutral negative
When the height of the metacenter is greater than the height of the center of gravity a vessel has which type of stability? Stable Negative Unstable Neutral
When the height of the metacenter is less than the height of the center of gravity, a vessel has which type of stability? Negative Positive Stable Neutral
When the height of the metacenter is greater than the height of the center of gravity, the upright equilibrium position is stable and stability is __________. negative neutral positive unstable
Metacentric height is an indication of a vessel's stability __________. for large angles of inclination for all angles of inclination for small angles of inclination in no case
What is the stability term for the distance from the center of gravity (G) to the Metacenter (M), when small-angle stability applies? metacentric radius metacentric height height of the metacenter righting arm
Which formula can be used to calculate metacentric height? KM - KG KM - GM KB + BM KM + GM
The difference between the height of the metacenter and the metacentric height is known as __________. height of the center of buoyancy metacentric radius righting arm height of the center of gravity
The abbreviation GM is used to represent the __________. righting moment height of the metacenter metacentric height righting arm
The difference between the height of the metacenter and the height of the center of gravity is known as the __________. fore and aft perpendicular height of the center of buoyancy metacentric height height of the righting arm
When initial stability applies, the height of the center of gravity plus the metacentric height equals the __________. height of the metacenter corrected height of the center of gravity free surface moments righting arm
The difference between the height of the metacenter and the height of the center of gravity is __________. KB GM KG KM
A negative metacentric height __________. always results from off-center weights will always cause a vessel to capsize should always be immediately corrected All of the above.
A negative metacentric height __________. will always cause a vessel to capsize always results from off-center weights should always be immediately corrected All of the above.
A negative metacentric height __________. should always be immediately corrected always results from off-center weights will always cause a vessel to capsize All of the above.
The righting moment can be determined by multiplying the displacement by the __________. vertical center of gravity (KG) righting arm (GZ) center of gravity (CG) longitudinal center of gravity (LCG)
GM cannot be used as an indicator of stability at all angles of inclination because __________. M is not fixed at large angles G is not fixed at large angles there is no G at large angles there is no M at large angles
The horizontal distance between the vertical lines of action of gravity and the buoyant forces is called the __________. metacentric height righting arm height of the center of buoyancy metacentric radius
Metacentric height is a measure of __________. stability through all angles maximum righting arm initial stability only All of the above.
When a vessel is floating upright, the distance from the keel to the metacenter is called the __________. height of the baseline metacentric radius righting arm height of the metacenter
Subtracting KG from KM yields __________. BM GM GZ KG
The important initial stability parameter, GM, is the __________. height of the center of buoyancy above the keel height of the metacenter above the keel metacentric height height of the center of gravity above the keel
Subtracting GM from KM yields __________. GM FS BL KG
For a floating vessel, the result of subtracting KG from KM is the __________. height of the center of buoyancy metacentric height height of the righting arm height of the metacenter
If the metacentric height is small, a vessel will __________. have a quick and rapid motion be tender have large angles of roll be stiff
If the metacentric height is large, a vessel will __________. be tender have a slow and easy motion be stiff have a tendency to yaw
When the height of the metacenter is the same as the height of the center of gravity, the metacentric height is equal to __________. half the height of the metacenter zero the height of the center of gravity the height of the metacenter
With no environmental forces acting on the vessel, the center of gravity of an inclined vessel is vertically aligned with the __________. metacenter longitudinal centerline original vertical centerline center of flotation
The moment created by a force of 12,000 tons and a moment arm of 0.25 foot is __________. 0 ft-tons 3,000 ft-tons 48,000 ft-tons 6,000 ft-tons
A moment of 300 ft-tons is created by a force of 15,000 tons. What is the moment arm? 25.00 feet 0.02 foot 0.04 foot 50.00 feet
The result of multiplying a weight by a distance is a __________. center of gravity location force couple moment
A moment is obtained by multiplying a force by its __________. couple point of application lever arm moment of inertia
The moment created by a force of 12,000 tons and a moment arm of 0.25 foot is __________. 0 ft-tons 6,000 ft-tons 3,000 ft-tons 48,000 ft-tons
A moment of 300 ft-tons is created by a force of 15,000 tons. What is the moment arm? 50.00 feet 25.00 feet 0.04 foot 0.02 foot
The magnitude of a moment is the product of the force and __________. angle of inclination time lever arm displacement
When a vessel has positive stability, the distance between the line of force through B and the line of force through G is called the __________. righting arm righting moment metacentric radius metacentric height
For a given displacement, the righting arm has its maximum value when __________. small-angle stability applies KM is a minimum angle of inclination is a maximum KG is minimum
When a wind force causes a vessel to heel to a static angle, the __________. centers of buoyancy and gravity are in the same vertical line righting moment equals the wind-heeling moment center of buoyancy remains the same deck-edge immersion occurs
For a vessel inclined by the wind, multiplying the buoyant force by the horizontal distance between the lines of action of the buoyant and gravity forces gives the __________. vertical moment longitudinal moment transverse moment righting moment
When positive stability exists, GZ represents the __________. metacentric height righting arm center of gravity righting moment
The angle of maximum righting arm corresponds approximately to the angle of __________. loll the load line deck edge immersion downflooding
A vessel is inclined at an angle of loll. In the absence of external forces, the righting arm (GZ) is __________. positive negative vertical zero
Transverse stability calculations require the use of __________. cross-sectional views of the vessel general arrangement plans hog or sag calculations or tables hydrostatic curves
The amount of freeboard which a ship possesses has a tremendous effect on its __________. permeability stability at large angles of inclination free surface initial stability
The change in weight (measured in tons) which causes a draft change of one inch is __________. MT1 inch ML1 inch TPI MH1 inch
The enclosed area defined as the intersection of the surface of the water and the hull of a vessel is the __________. longitudinal reference plane baseline waterplane amidships plane
The waterplane area is described as the intersection of the surface of the water in which a vessel floats and the __________. baseline horizontal reference plane hull vertical reference plane
Initial stability refers to stability __________. when loaded with minimum deck load when GZ is zero at small angles of inclination when at transit draft
Initial stability of a vessel may be improved by __________. closing crossover valves between partly filled double bottom tanks adding weight low in the vessel removing loose water All of the above.
In illustration D001SA below, what represents the center of gravity? G GZ M B
On a vessel, multiplying a load's weight by the distance of the load's center of gravity above the baseline results in a(n) __________. righting moment inclining moment transverse moment vertical moment
The center of gravity of a freely swinging load suspended from a pedestal crane acts as if it were located at the __________. pedestal longitudinal centerline point of suspension counterweight
Which will be a result of removing on-deck containers? KB will increase Metacentric height will increase KG will increase Reserve buoyancy will decrease
When cargo is shifted from the lower hold to the main deck the __________. center of gravity will move upwards GM will increase center of buoyancy will move downward All of the above.
What will happen when cargo is shifted from the main deck into the lower hold of a vessel? The GM will increase. The center of buoyancy will move upward. The metacenter will move upward. All of the above.
You must shift a weight from the upper 'tween deck to the lower hold. This shift will __________. make the vessel more tender increase the rolling period make the vessel stiffer decrease the metacentric height
Deballasting a double bottom has what effect on KG? KG increases at light drafts and decreases at deep drafts. KG is not affected. KG is increased. KG is decreased.
Which action will best increase the transverse stability of a merchant vessel at sea? Ballasting the double bottom tanks Deballasting the deep tanks Raising the cargo booms to the upright position Positioning a heavy lift cargo on the main deck
The center of buoyancy and the metacenter are in the line of action of the buoyant force __________. only when there is positive stability at all times only when there is negative stability only when there is neutral stability
The vertical distance between G and M is used as a measure of __________. stability at angles less than the downflooding angle initial stability stability at angles less than the limit of positive stability stability at all angles of inclination
Unstable equilibrium exists at small angles of inclination when __________. B is off the centerline G is off the centerline B is above G G is above M
If the vertical center of gravity (VCG) of a ship rises, the righting arm (GZ) for the various angles of inclination will __________. increase be changed by the amount of GG' x cosine of the angle decrease remain unchanged
When stability of a vessel is neutral, the value of GM __________. only depends on the height of the center of gravity is zero is greater when G is low only depends on the height of the metacenter
Reducing free surfaces has the effect of lowering the __________. metacentric height virtual height of the center of gravity uncorrected KG metacenter
Increasing free surfaces has the effect of raising the __________. metacentric height virtual height of the center of gravity uncorrected KG metacenter
GM cannot be used as an indicator of stability at all angles of inclination because __________. M is not fixed at large angles G is not fixed at large angles there is no G at large angles there is no M at large angles
The righting moment can be determined by multiplying the displacement by the __________. longitudinal center of gravity (LCG) righting arm (GZ) vertical center of gravity (KG) center of gravity (CG)
Which statement is TRUE of a tender vessel? It has a good transverse stability. It has a large GM. It has a very low center of gravity. Its period of roll is long.
What is used as an indicator of initial stability? GZ GM KG KM
Initial stability is indicated by __________. GM KM Maximum allowed KG Deck load
Vertical moment is obtained by multiplying a vessel's weight and its __________. TCG LCG VCG or KG LCB
A vertical shift of weight to a position above the vessel's center of gravity will __________. increase reserve buoyancy increase KM decrease the righting moments decrease KG
When making a turn (course change) on most merchant ships, the vessel will heel outwards if __________. the vessel is deeply laden the vessel has very little draft G is below the center of lateral resistance G is above the center of lateral resistance
Which statement is TRUE of a stiff vessel? She will pitch heavily. Her period of roll will be large due to her large metacentric height. She will have a large metacentric height. She will have an unusually high center of gravity.
A quick and rapid motion of a vessel in a seaway is an indication of a(n) __________. high center of gravity small GZ large GM excessive free surface
A slow and easy motion of a vessel in a seaway is an indication of a __________. small GM stiff vessel large GZ low center of gravity
Vessels "A" and "B" are identical; however, "A" is more tender than "B". This means that "A" relative to "B" has a __________. smaller GM lower KG smaller roll angle larger GZ
In order to minimize the effects of a tender vessel, when carrying a cargo of lumber, you should __________. keep the vessel's frame spaces free from lumber place the heaviest woods in the lower holds distribute lumber so that those stowing most compactly per unit of weight are in the upper holds maximize your deck load
Which is TRUE of a "stiff" vessel? It has a small GM. It has an unusually high center of gravity. Its period of roll is short. It pitches heavily.
The KG of a vessel is found by dividing the displacement into the __________. sum of the longitudinal moments of the vessel height of the center of gravity of the vessel sum of the free surface moments of the vessel sum of the vertical moments of the vessel
If the result of loading a vessel is an increase in the height of the center of gravity, there will always be an increase in the __________. righting arm righting moment metacentric height vertical moments
The important stability parameter "KG" is defined as the __________. metacentric height height of the center of gravity above the keel height of the metacenter above the keel height of the center of buoyancy above the keel
A partially full tank causes a virtual rise in the height of the __________. center of gravity metacenter center of buoyancy center of flotation
Which technique could be used to give a more comfortable roll to a stiff vessel? Move weights lower in the ship Add weight near the centerline of the lower hold Ballast the peak tanks Concentrate weights on upper decks
What will NOT decrease the stability of a vessel? Topside icing Using 35% of the fuel in a full tank Lowering a weight suspended by a boom onto the deck Running with a following sea
A virtual rise in the center of gravity may be caused by __________. filling a partially filled tank using an on board crane to lift a freely swinging heavy object emptying a partially filled tank transferring ballast from the forepeak to the after peak
One of the main purposes of the inclining experiment on a vessel is to determine the __________. maximum load line position of the metacenter position of the center of buoyancy location of the center of gravity of the light ship
The purpose of the inclining experiment is to __________. determine the lightweight center of gravity location determine the location of the metacenter verify data in the vessel's operating manual verify the hydrostatic data
Aboard a vessel, dividing the sum of the longitudinal moments by the total weight yields the vessel's __________. vertical moments righting moments longitudinal position of the center of gravity inclining moments
A vessel's LCG is determined by __________. dividing the total vertical moment summations by displacement subtracting LCF from LCB dividing the total longitudinal moment summations by displacement multiplying the MT1 by the longitudinal moments
Pitching is angular motion of the vessel about what axis? Transverse Vertical Centerline Longitudinal
Rolling is angular motion of the vessel about what axis? Longitudinal Vertical Centerline Transverse
Angular motion about the longitudinal axis of a vessel is known as __________. pitch surge roll sway
The horizontal fore-and-aft movement of a vessel is called __________. surge heave yaw sway
Horizontal fore or aft motion of a vessel is known as __________. roll sway pitch surge
The horizontal port or starboard movement of a vessel is called __________. sway yaw heave surge
Horizontal transverse motion of a vessel is known as __________. pitch surge sway heave
Angular motion about the vertical axis of a vessel is called __________. sway surge yaw roll
Which action will affect the trim of a vessel? Moving high weights lower Moving a weight forward Adding weight at the tipping center All of the above.
The ship's tanks most effective for trimming are the __________. peaks settlers domestics deeps
Those ship's tanks that are particularly important for trimming the ship are the __________. settlers domestics deeps peaks
The change in trim of a vessel may be found by __________. looking at the Hydrostatic Properties Table for the draft of the vessel dividing the trim moments by MT1 dividing longitudinal moments by the displacement subtracting the LCF from the LCB
Which would NOT provide extra buoyancy for a vessel with no sheer? Lighter draft Higher bulwark Raised fo'c'sle head Raised poop
The "trimming arm" of a vessel is the horizontal distance between the __________. LHA and LCG LCF and LCG LCB and LCF LCB and LCG
When a vessel's LCG is aft of her LCB, the vessel will __________. trim by the stern be on an even keel trim by the head be tender
The two points that act together to trim a ship are the __________. LCF and LCB LCG and LCB VCG and LCG metacenter and LCG
Longitudinal moment is obtained by multiplying a vessel's weight and its __________. LCG VCG or KG TCG LCB
The LCG of a vessel may be found by dividing displacement into the __________. longitudinal center of gravity of the vessel longitudinal baseline of the vessel sum of the longitudinal moments of the vessel sum of the vertical moments of the vessel
A vessel trimmed by the stern has a __________. set drag list sheer
A ship's forward draft is 22'-04" and its after draft is 23'-00". The draft amidships is 23'-04". This indicates a concentration of weight __________. at the bow at the ends amidships in the lower holds
The forward draft of your ship is 27'-11" and the after draft is 29'-03". The draft amidships is 28'-05". Your vessel is __________. listed trimmed by the head hogged sagged
A ship's forward draft is 22'-04" and its after draft is 23'-00". The draft amidships is 23'-04". This indicates a concentration of weight __________. amidships at the ends in the lower holds at the bow
The result of two forces acting in opposite directions and along parallel lines, is an example of what type of stress? Strain Tensile Compression Shear
The shearing stresses on a ship's structure are usually greatest at __________. the bow the ship's quarter-length points midships the stern
Tensile stress is a result of two forces acting in __________. opposite directions on the same line, tending to compress the object opposite directions along parallel lines opposite directions on the same line, tending to pull the material apart the same direction along parallel lines
A vessel's bottom will be subjected to tension when weight is concentrated __________. amidships forward at both ends of the vessel aft
Weight concentration in which area will cause a vessel's bottom to be subjected to tension stresses? Forward Aft Amidships At both ends
Signs of racking stresses generally appear at the __________. junction of the frames with the beams and floors garboard strake, at each side of the keel thrust bearing of the main shaft bow and stern shell frames and plating
When a vessel is stationary and in a hogging condition, the main deck is under which type of stress? racking tension shear compression
When a vessel is stationary and in a hogging condition, the main deck is under __________. tension stress shear stress compression stress racking stress
If a vessel is sagging, which kind of stress is placed on the sheer strake? Tension Thrust Racking Compression
When a vessel is stationary and in a hogging condition, the main deck is under __________. shear stress racking stress tension stress compression stress
If a vessel is sagging, what kind of stress is placed on the sheer strake? Thrust Compression Tension Racking
Your vessel has a midships engine room and the cargo is concentrated in the end holds. The vessel is __________. hogging with tensile stress on main deck hogging with compressive stress on main deck sagging with compressive stress on main deck sagging with tensile stress on main deck
Which is the MOST important consideration for a tank vessel? The vertical center of gravity The stress on the hull The longitudinal center of gravity GM
The normal tendency for a loaded tanker is to __________. have a permanent list hog be very tender sag
Of the following, the most important consideration for a tank vessel is __________. the longitudinal center of gravity GM the stress on the hull the vertical center of gravity
What is not usually a concern when loading a single-hulled tanker? Initial stability Trim Draft Bending moments
The angular movement of a vessel about a horizontal line drawn from its bow to its stern is __________. rolling heaving pitching swaying
The vertical motion of a floating vessel is known as __________. heave sway yaw surge
The vertical motion of a floating vessel in which the entire hull is lifted by the force of the sea is known as __________. sway surge heave pitch
Yawing is angular motion of the vessel about what axis? Longitudinal Transverse Vertical Centerline
Heave is motion along the __________. longitudinal axis centerline axis transverse axis vertical axis
What is NOT a motion of the vessel? Trim Roll Yaw Pitch
The time required to incline from port to starboard and back to port again is called __________. rolling period range of stability inclining moment initial stability
The time required to incline from bow down to stern down and return to bow down again is called __________. amplitude moment inclining moment rolling period pitching period
The tendency of a vessel to return to its original trim after being inclined by an external force is __________. transverse stability buoyancy longitudinal stability equilibrium